Podcast Episode 17 – It’s Time to Heal – A Message from Patryce

Healing Nature Image

Perhaps you have realized that it’s time to heal. Have you thought about really taking the time to get to know yourself in 2021? When we reflect on who we are we can begin to make the changes necessary to become who we want to be. Taking care of our body and mind are important steps in this process and finding a community to support you along the way is an integral part also.

Patryce shares some important thoughts on these matters with the hopes of inspiring and encouraging you along the way in this new year. Happy New Year to each and every one of you!

In light of COVID, let’s make sure that we have a robust immune system and then share that knowledge with others.

We want to come alongside you, as well, as we all continue moving toward a positive direction to support our healthy lifestyles. If there are any specific ways that we can be of assistance, please contact us through our contact form or send a verbal message through Speakpipe.

OTHER WAYS TO SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN:
iTunes Logo Breaker Logo Google Podcasts Logo OverCast Podcasts Logo Pocket Casts Logo Radio Public Podcasts Logo Spotify Logo RSS Feed Logo Anchor

We invite you to listen and share your perspectives with us too. Send us a recorded message through Speakpipe. We may use your message in an upcoming episode, therefore, please leave your name if you would like it to be noted during the podcast. Leave an email address if you would like a personal response or feel free to use the contact form.

If you haven’t done so already, download the Delicious “No-Fail” Salads Guide – another great way to eat those GREENS!

Follow Chef AJ’s Livestreams – Chef AJ shares expert interviews, healthy recipes, and her weight loss journey. She has been streaming multiple times daily since 2021. So much content for you to enjoy.

Physician’s Committee for Responsible Health
YouTube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/c/PhysiciansCommittee/featured
Website – https://www.pcrm.org/

The Barnard Medical Center (The Barnard Medical Center is now offering telemedicine appointments, allowing patients to consult with caregivers online through their computers or phones. Available to residents of California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Missouri, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and Washington, D.C.)

Dr. Baxter Montgomery’s Montgomery Heart & Wellness Program
YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOEQWbsZyc3ygIlRB5HQmqw
Website:

Fight COVID-19 with Food

Links to the G-Bombs series (which also includes some recipe videos):

Episode 17 - It's time to heal message from Patryce_2

Patryce: There are so many things that are not within our control, but the foods that we choose to eat are more in our control.

[00:00:18] Hi,

[00:00:19] Shonda: and hello. Welcome to the Real Food and Drinks Lifestyle Podcast. We're building a community to talk about nutrition, lifestyle choices, and just feeling better. This is Shonda

[00:00:33] Patryce: and this is Patryce. Let's just be real.

[00:00:45] Shonda: Here's our disclaimer. We do not officially practice in any of the various subjects that we discuss. We are only sharing our personal experiences with you to a healthier lifestyle. Please do your own research before taking part in any of these practices.

[00:01:03] Patryce: Hello, this is Patryce. Happy New Year, everyone.

[00:01:08] And I just wanted to begin with talking about how important it is to get to know our bodies more, to get to know. What foods agree or disagree with us to get to know our emotions better just to get to know ourselves. So I hope that you're encouraged in this new year to do things, to be more in tune with who you are.

[00:01:33] And when you discover, there are things that you don't like or want to improve, then make steps to do that. And so with that said, I'd like to talk specifically like Shonda about the healing that we should promote within our own bodies and within our own communities. And especially with COVID still very much around.

[00:01:55] The reality is the best defense is a robust immune system. So what can we do to improve our immune systems? Well, I think one is focusing on preventative care, be our own advocate. That means with regards to our health, being our number one advocate for ourselves, and that begins with what can I do to prevent from getting ill or having chronic illnesses appear?

[00:02:29] So with the word preventative, I'm talking about of course food. There's so many things that are not within our control, but the foods that we choose to eat are more in our control. So why not focus on foods that we eat, because that is more in our control than other things. So I am ...I I'm hoping that in 2021, we are encouraged to try to do better.

[00:02:59] And with that said, I'm reminded of a podcast. We did not so long ago on G-BOMBS. And I was encouraged by that podcast myself and ever since then, I've noticed each day I'm incorporating more and more of those foods that fall into the G-BOMBS categories. And I have found it folks so easy, for example, to have a salad where I have greens, spinach, kale, arugala, and then I actually put some black beans on there.

[00:03:34] And then sometimes, often I put some seeds on there and maybe some nuts and lately even mushrooms. So I have most of the G-BOMBS just in one meal. So be encouraged that. We can do so many things in the way of preventative care, starting with how we eat and how we think. I think more and more, we need to pay attention to our thought life because depression is real.

[00:04:03] There are many people stressed out and. Uh, for so many reasons, there are so many things going on in our world, but it's how are we dealing with these emotions? And along with food, we need to consider our emotional health because that going unchecked and just going South can actually affect or impact negatively our physical health.

[00:04:29] So we have to be mindful of our emotional health too. So to help prevent the deterioration or onset of chronic diseases, we also want to keep in mind working towards a strong and healthy, emotional wellbeing. And sometimes we need help with that. So don't be afraid to reach out, reach out to loved ones, reach out, to help lines, reach out to your community, reach out to your family, your friends, your church.

[00:04:59] Whoever you can, if you feel that you need help with your emotions. So we talked about preventative. I wanted to talk about empowerment. By deciding to change habits or creating good habits we are empowering ourselves to live our best life. Another way to empower ourselves is to avail ourselves to all the different information out there.

[00:05:28] For instance, there are many, many documentaries in the way of, of different foods and how our different foods are processed are made available to us in America? There are documentaries on plant-based eating on the pros and cons to dairy. Um, there's just a lot of documentaries out there. I'm not telling you exactly which ones to watch, but I will say that's part of what catapulted my journey was watching some documentaries and then taking to heart what I learned in these documentaries. Knowledge is power. And so part of empowering ourselves is to read up, obtain knowledge. Be open to hearing different things and finding out what works for us. And when we do find new knowledge that is beneficial, share it, share it with someone else, share it with your communities.

[00:06:24] And then lastly, I did want to talk about what are some tangible, practical, next steps. So it's 2021. It's a new year. And so often we hear people talk about resolutions, nothing's wrong with that, or making big changes, but what, what does that look like? So I just want to speak a moment about how might you identify next steps with regards to a healthier lifestyle overall?

[00:06:50] And I would say. Do a self evaluation start a journal. And if you're not big writer, that's okay. Do a video journal or do an audio journal. I know a lot of our phones have it where you can just record your voice. So just do whatever it takes to...But do something to start reflecting on your life and what's working and not working.

[00:07:14] And then when, as you identify these things, then you can make adjustments. So the first thing is to do a reality check, be real with yourself, ask yourself, you know, what am I doing right now? How am I feeling right now? Where am I excelling? And where am I falling a little short? And after doing that real evaluation and specifically speaking with what you're eating right now, then the next step is how do I start changing?

[00:07:44] And maybe it is just one change at a time. For example, maybe it's trying to do the G-BOMBS as much as you can each day, certainly more than once a week. Making sure you have, if not everything, part of the G-BOMBS, just some of those G-BOMBS in the beginning, and then identifying any bad habits and one by one, changing from those. Getting rid of those.

[00:08:09] So those are just a couple suggestions on tangible next steps and be encouraged. There's this community. And many other podcasts, YouTube communities. I know myself and Shonda. We listened to Dr. Baxter. Montgomery's YouTube each Monday night, 7:00 PM central standard time. And he, uh, a cardiologist here in the Houston area, along with several other doctors are just sharing about different subjects each week with anyone who's willing to listen. So I would encourage between documentaries, different podcasts, different you tubes to reach out and listen and grow from learning from different communities. They're here to encourage you such as ours.

[00:08:59] I hope that you've heard our hearts to just help you to realize that this can be a time of healing. Let's focus on how do we get better and in light of COVID, how do we make sure that we have a robust immune system and then share that knowledge with others? So I was looking and was reminded of the word of God, because at the end of the day, I seek God's wisdom and try to abide in his truths and his word for peace.

[00:09:37] Because at the end of the day, I think we all want peace, but hopefully it's not just the peace of this world you're looking for, because that is so fleeting. But in Christ Jesus we have eternal peace, real peace, but I just wanted to leave you with one scripture that came to mind from the book of Proverbs in the Bible. In Proverbs 17 that's chapter 17 in the 22nd verse.

[00:10:04] It just reads a joyful heart is good medicine, but a crushed spirit dries up the bones. And all I want to bring that up for is I think it would be easier to have a joyful spirit if we have a well taken care of or better taken care of body and mind. So with that said, I hope you're encouraged to know that day by day, step by step, we can grow.

[00:10:34] We can improve. We can create good habits. Separate or depart from our bad habits. Be encouraged and share that encouragement with someone else to build a stronger, healthier community. Thank you. I hope that you found something in this podcast helpful, and that you will share with your friends and family, this podcast, and our past ones. Be encouraged.

[00:11:01] This is Patryce for Real Food and Drinks.

[00:11:07] Shonda: Thanks for listening. We hope you enjoy today's podcast. Remember you can catch show notes and additional details at RealFoodAndDrinks.com under the podcast menu. Also subscribe to our podcast. If you aren't already a member of our community. And if listening through Anchor, please send us a message of topics you would like to hear us have conversations about.

[00:11:34] Until next time... let's just be real. .

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Photo by Shashank Sahay on Unsplash

Podcast Episode 16 – It’s Time to Heal – A Message from Shonda

Horizon Image

It’s Time to Heal especially due to COVID-19. For this reason, we must try to be our healthiest and strengthen our immune systems.

I didn’t want to ignore that it’s a new year and that many are looking to make health improvements. It is really a great time to do so because it will be more likely that you can find someone else to join you while you help encourage one another on the journey.

We want to come alongside you, as well, as we all continue moving toward a positive direction to support our healthy lifestyles. If there are any specific ways that we can be of assistance, please contact us through our contact form or send a verbal message through Speakpipe.

OTHER WAYS TO SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN:
iTunes Logo Breaker Logo Google Podcasts Logo OverCast Podcasts Logo Pocket Casts Logo Radio Public Podcasts Logo Spotify Logo RSS Feed Logo Anchor

We invite you to listen and share your perspectives with us too. Send us a recorded message through Speakpipe. We may use your message in an upcoming episode, therefore, please leave your name if you would like it to be noted during the podcast. Leave an email address if you would like a personal response or feel free to use the contact form.

If you haven’t done so already, download the Delicious “No-Fail” Salads Guide – another great way to eat those GREENS!

Physician’s Committee for Responsible Health
YouTube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/c/PhysiciansCommittee/featured
Website – https://www.pcrm.org/

The Barnard Medical Center (The Barnard Medical Center is now offering telemedicine appointments, allowing patients to consult with caregivers online through their computers or phones. Available to residents of California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Missouri, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and Washington, D.C.)

Fight COVID-19 with Food

Dr. Baxter Montgomery’s Montgomery Heart & Wellness Program
YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOEQWbsZyc3ygIlRB5HQmqw
Website:

Links to the G-Bombs series

Shonda (00:00): Hey everyone. This is Shonda here, and I just wanted to take this time to bring you a happy new year message and the message is it's time to heal.

Shonda (00:24): Hi and hello. Welcome to the real food and drinks lifestyle podcast. We're building a community to talk about nutrition, lifestyle choices, and just feeling better. This is Shonda and this is Patryce. Let's just be real. [inaudible] Here's our disclaimer. We do not officially practice in any of the various subjects that we discuss. We are only sharing our personal experiences with you to a healthier lifestyle. Please do your own research before taking part in any of these practices.

Shonda (01:09): We've had a pretty rough and tough 2020, and it has flown by due to COVID still causing many issues and problems in our life. I just thought that it would be a very good time to focus on our health. Very often, that is a new year's resolution. And I think it's a really great one, especially due to the circumstances that we find ourselves in. Now is the time to heal because it's time to take our health seriously, you know, especially those that are knowingly dealing with a chronic disease. It's time that we do the research that we need, that we seek others to see what they've done to solve the problems. There are solutions and whatever it takes, we need to convince ourselves that it's possible for us and that we can do it just like others have done. We can also do the same and heal our bodies.

Shonda (02:09): Okay. The COVID-19 virus has revealed that many are not in a healthy state. So yes, in addition to those who are knowingly fighting against a chronic disease, there are still some who are not in a healthy state and maybe don't quite know it yet. And here are some things to consider if you're not quite sure, do you have digestive issues? Maybe these digestive issues aren't enough to have you going to the doctor, but they're troublesome. Perhaps you have seasonal allergies. Perhaps you have rashes that are showing on your skin, but you're just dealing with all these things. And it's no big deal. Well, hey, these many times are big deals and they're just the precursor to other chronic diseases. This is just the first step, a hint that lets us know that something is going wrong. What about an additional step that can help us deal with the chronic disease so that we're not in as much trouble if we have to face COVID-19,

Shonda (03:17): The medications are dealing with the symptoms, they are not solving the problem. The problem is still happening. You can't see it and you can't feel it, but it's still there because as soon as you stop taking those medications, it's very evident. Okay? So from my point of view, there is a lack of quality health care. Doctors are prescribing meds to take care of symptoms, but ignoring the true problem, which is our diet, our Western American diet. Did you know that many cultures prior to being introduced to our Western American diet had diets that were heavily loaded with plant foods? And just a bit of animal foods scattered in there. If at all, you know, we live in a country which is for many abundant and it's abundant in meat products and cheese products, you know, milk and dairy. But that doesn't mean that we should be consuming these products in the quantities that we're consuming them.

Shonda (04:21): So my question to you is, do you really want to continue to take prescription meds to support a diet that is not serving you well? Okay. So is it that you don't believe in the power of food because the power of food can heal. The power of food can cause these illnesses or it can cause healing. Or is it just that you don't want to give up your current foods that are causing the issues? I'm asking you this in the most loving way that I know, perhaps you have never even thought about this. Perhaps you just feel stuck or like there is something that you cannot do to help yourself. That's tell our doctors, Hey, I'm about to do something to get off these medications and I'm going to need your help. And if the doctor isn't willing find another doctor.

Shonda (05:11): There's a doctor network through the physician's committee of responsible medicines. They also are accepting tele-health calls. So I just urge you. We cannot wait on a vaccine. We want to be healthy, instead. We don't want to depend on a vaccine. I'm not saying don't take the vaccine. But what I am saying is if you're going to take the vaccine, we also need to take steps toward health that can help us fight the COVID-19. Make it, make our immune system even stronger. So this is just an introduction to the new year. There's a link below. Tell us what you need. Tell us what kind of recipes you need. Tell us what kind of resources you need to find in order to make the next step, because your next step can start right now today. It can start with your next meal, by taking a daily walk, by getting more sleep, by seeking more education about COVID-19 and all your health concerns.

Shonda (06:11): There's information out there. And when you start looking for the truth, you will find the truth. So I want to urge you to take it in your own hands. Be... Be your own healthcare advocate, decide that you want to know the truth, decide that you're going to try to make a difference in your own health care. Our hope is that you will begin to research healthy alternatives. In addition to conventional medicine, as a reminder, there are links below to get you started. And also we should just that you begin to follow some of these plant-based doctors. So you don't miss their content. Be a student of theirs. Listen, to find truth within what they have to say to us. We want you to be healthy, to experience freedom from fear, to feel confident, to feel empowered. It's not that we do not respect COVID-19 yes, we must do what we can.

Shonda (07:11): We will continue to wear our mask and social distance. This is a way that we love our neighbors. We love those around us because we don't want to spread the disease, especially to someone who's going to have a difficult time fighting the disease. But we want you to also feel and know that you're doing the best that you can in order to build up your immune system. And that's all that we can do. And then we leave everything else in God's hands. So Happy New Year, and let's make this the best one ever. It's time to heal. Thank you all for joining me today. Next week, we will have part two of "A time to heal", which will be a message from Patryce.

Shonda (07:58): Thanks for listening. We hope you enjoy today's podcast. Remember you can catch show notes and additional details at realfoodanddrinks.com under the podcast menu. Also subscribe to our podcast, if you aren't already a member of our community. And if listening through Anchor, please send us a message of topics you would like to hear us have conversations about until next time. Let's just be real.

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Photo by Shashank Sahay on Unsplash

Podcast Episode 15 – New Year – A look back, but let’s keep moving towards health

Happy New Year

We take a look at where we started, long before this year. Today is simply a reality check. That’s all…no worries. Let’s just make sure we all keep moving towards heath. We share some of our favorite memories of past eating habits, some of which you might relate to in your past or even present. Yet, we discuss how we have replaced the foods that needed replacing and why we did so. Need a dose of inspiration? How about a dose of laughter?  Proverbs 17:22 says “A joyful heart is good medicine.”

OTHER WAYS TO SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN:
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We invite you to listen and share your perspectives with us too. Send us a recorded message through Speakpipe. We may use your message in an upcoming episode, therefore, please leave your name if you would like it to be noted during the podcast. Leave an email address if you would like a personal response or feel free to use the contact form.

If you haven’t done so already, download the Delicious “No-Fail” Salads Guide – another great way to eat those GREENS!

Show References & Additional Notes:

Coming Soon

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Podcast Episode 14 – Immunity – The Second ‘B’ and the ‘S’ in G-BOMBS

Onions and Mushrooms

‘B’ is for berries and ‘S’ is for seeds/nuts in the acronym G-BOMBS. Today we wrap up the G-BOMBS Series. We talk about our favorite seeds, nuts, and berries and share ideas about how you can incorporate these foods into your diet. Stay tuned for our challenge at the very end.

G-BOMBS defined: G = Greens, B = Beans, O = Onions, M = Mushrooms, B = Berries, and S = Seeds.

OTHER WAYS TO SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN:
iTunes Logo Breaker Logo Google Podcasts Logo OverCast Podcasts Logo Pocket Casts Logo Radio Public Podcasts Logo Spotify Logo RSS Feed Logo Anchor

We invite you to listen and share your perspectives with us too. Send us a recorded message through Speakpipe. We may use your message in an upcoming episode, therefore, please leave your name if you would like it to be noted during the podcast. Leave an email address if you would like a personal response or feel free to use the contact form.

If you haven’t done so already, download the Delicious “No-Fail” Salads Guide – another great way to eat those GREENS!

Show References & Additional Notes:

Flaxseeds are one of the richest sources of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids which means is it anti-inflammatory.

Recipes:

Oatmeal Bars with Berries and Seeds

Oatmeal Options

Chocolate Chia Mousse

Raspberry Chia Jam (A double-dose of seeds.)

Other online resources:

EWG’s (Environmental Working Group’s) Dirty Dozen Shopping Guide

G-BOMBS Nutrition Bars – Chocolate Peanut Butter

Dr. Fuhrman’s G-BOMBS Downloadable Guide

Dr. Fuhrman

Patryce (00:00): Hi, Shonda how are you?

Shonda (00:02): Good. So, Hey, what, what are you talking about today? Oh, we're finishing up G-BOMBS today.

Patryce (00:09): Yes. Yes. B the other B. And we're going to do B and S so we're doing berries and seeds, right?

Shonda (00:18): Berries and seeds. That's right.

Shonda (00:31): Hi and hello. Welcome to the real food and drinks lifestyle podcast. We're building a community to talk about nutrition, lifestyle choices, and just feeling better. This is Shonda and this is Patryce. Let's just be real. [inaudible] Here's our disclaimer. We do not officially practice in any of the various subjects that we discuss. We are only sharing our personal experiences with you to a healthier lifestyle. Please do your own research before taking part in any of these practices.

Shonda (01:21): G-BOMBS is an acronym that you can use to remember the best anti-cancer, health-promoting foods on the planet. So check out the show notes. Learn more information. Learn more information. There will be recipes and a few videos to support what we're discussing today. Let's see berries and seeds. So berries and seeds. Seeds also includes nuts. So we'll be talking about all these things today. And I guess just like we've been doing, I mean, let's just talk about what our favorites are and you know, maybe some things we want to try out or something like that. And, um, how to incorporate berries and seeds and nuts.

Patryce (01:54): I'm a big fan of berries, but I do know my favorite. And one of them would be blueberries because they're, well, first of all, what are berries? There's small, soft round fruit. And they come in various colors like blue, red, or purple. And, um, so one of my favorites are blueberries. And as far as I know, they're just, they're blue, dark blue, purple, whatever you want to call it. But these are not only delicious and nutritious, but they're very convenient (I find them to be) to pop in your yogurt or just to eat by the handful. And some people freeze them and just have berry treats. So frozen little berries, [Right, Yeah] that'd be good. Good to... And they're a good source of fiber, vitamin C, and uh, all these I think are low in calories. Another favorite for me are raspberries. Sometimes I eat blueberries and raspberries together. Uh, generally, I get red raspberries for the family. And again, the one thing about raspberries though... I did not realize they come in black. Black, black, raspberries.

Shonda (03:02): Hm, black raspberries?

Patryce (03:05): Apparently, the only reason I bring it up, is apparently they're all good for you, but the black rasberries maybe even a more nutritious. So I'd love to try those out. So I'll be on the look out for the black raspberries and then also another favorite strawberries. And I think that is a popular one in the U. S. Period, then also cranberries And I love, I like cranberries. I like that tartness. Unlike the rest, they have more tart a tart taste and they're very, they're well-known to be beneficial to females for the urinary tract health. Blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, oh, acai berries. And I know people pronounce it different ways, but that's the way I'm going to pronounce it today.

Shonda (03:53): Now, those are usually...you usually get those dried already, right?

Patryce (03:56): Yes. Dried or nowadays we get a lot of them... Frozen packs of them to throw into the smoothie.

Shonda (04:03): Okay. And they're bitter, right? Like cranberries.

Patryce (04:06): Yes. I'm glad you brought that up because they are naturally more bitter or not as sweet, but so many things sold with acai berries have sugar added. So you have to be careful about that because acai berries are originally from the Amazon. And so we look out for the ones you purchase so that you're not getting more sugar than you expect. Um, so that's why we usually get the packs. And there's a brand that doesn't have sugar added and all of these that I've mentioned have seeds in them, uh, I don't think there's any need to not eat the seeds, but actually the seeds are healthy.

Shonda (04:45): Right. You know, I think one thing we should mention is if, if it's possible to buy, um, organic berries, because berries are sprayed with a lot of pesticides normally, because they're just a tender fruit, you know, and, and insects are attracted to them. Yeah. I mean, maybe not even every time, but sometimes treat yourself to organic berries. Fruit that 's soft that we eat the whole fruit try to go organic. And the other fruits that maybe have a peel on them, not that necessary to go organic, if you have to choose which to buy organic and which not. Hey, I just thought of one that I don't think you mentioned. Well, there are two. What about cherries? And they're naturally sweet. They can be tart and sweet at the same time. Those are some that I know that we really enjoy here along with, um, my daughter likes blackberries.

Patryce (05:49): Oh, that's right. I forgot those. Yeah. Those are yummy too.

Shonda (05:52): Other ways that we can use berries are, you know, did you mention already putting them on top of oatmeal?

Patryce (05:58): No, I didn't mention any uses. Just my favorite.

Shonda (06:01): Just drop them on oatmeal and you know, along with what we're going to talk about next, that would, that just makes a great combination for seeds and nuts and berries all on top of your oatmeal. And then, you know, um, I bought, since we just came out of, uh, Thanksgiving season, I did buy some organic cranberries and I rinsed them and I put them on a single layer and I froze them, you know, put them in a bag. And then now it doesn't take many to get the benefits from them. I can throw five in a smoothie, you know, that's kind of sweet with bananas and things and it doesn't, and it's not like I'm just trying to eat a cranberry smoothie, just throwing like four or five in there. You know, if I put that in there every day, over time, that adds up. So that's one option. That's something new that I just started knowing that I need more of the, the red antioxidant type berry in my diet.

Patryce (06:58): That's a great tip because I have a pack of cranberries in the refrigerator that we didn't use. And I'm like, what am I going to do with all these? But I can freeze them. You're saying. And I think we've mentioned already that the, I mean, of course they're healthy foods, they're high in vitamin C, they're antioxidants... They have fiber. And because of that, fiber will help make you feel more cool and they're low in calories. So those of us who are looking at our waist, trying to stay our fit selves, it's another good way to do so by having various for a treat or even for dessert fruit can be a great dessert option. And yeah, we can make our parfait with, well, I'm not as creative as you are, but with the fruit, with the yogurt. And then we're going to talk about seeds and nuts. Maybe we should move into that now because berries and seeds and nuts that they go well.. They compliment one another,.

Shonda (07:49): Right? Yeah, they do. Okay. Yeah. Let's talk about that.

Patryce (07:52): So what are your favorite seeds or nuts?

Shonda (07:55): Well, On a regular basis in the pantry, we have walnuts, almonds, pecans, sunflower seeds, and pumpkin seeds. Those are the top five that I keep and I do throw all of them in oatmeal on a regular basis. If I'm having oatmeal, I'm having a nut with it. At least a nut. I may not have a fruit, may not have a fruit, but I always have a nut or, you know, nut milk. I do sometimes make my own nut milk by just adding water and nuts and blending it up and squeezing it out in a nut bag. That's a little extra step, but it's really creamy. It's really creamy when you make it on your own, because you can make it as thick or thin as you want. Just makes for a delicious breakfast. I throw raisins in there and this morning I threw fresh cranberries in there. Those are our top five. I usually keep the pantry well-stocked with that. Uh, Leslie and I are the only two that really eat the nuts and we both put it in our oatmeal.

Patryce (09:05): We have some of the same nuts. Um, one thing, um, did you mention, yeah, you did mention pumpkin seeds. And did you mentioned flaxseed?

Shonda (09:14): Not yet. Do you use a lot of flaxseeds?

Patryce (09:20): I have begun to explore use of flaxseeds. And as I had told you over the Thanksgiving holiday I actually made that yummy, sweet potato pie, but I learned that you need to..., I had not bought the flaxseeds.

Shonda (09:34): Ground flax seed,.

Patryce (09:36): So I learned that that you can still eat them, not ground, but I''ve made since another pie with a texture that was definitely improve upon. They have a bit of a nutty smell to me...[inaudible] and then flaxseeds have a lot of health benefits. Yeah. So I'm trying to incorporate those more.

Shonda (09:56): Yeah, they do. They are, I will definitely put a link to that, but I know they have high amounts of good fatty acids. So yeah, I use a lot of flax seeds because I make like, when I make any kind of breads or pancakes or anything, I use it in place of an egg... Ground and mixed with water and it becomes a good egg replacement. So that was really how I started using flax seeds. And I also, every now and then I do remember just because I don't remember when it's already ground, I keep it in the freezer to keep it from going rancid. And I remember to put it in my smoothie, but it's in another freezer. It's not with my fruit, so maybe I should move it over to the fruit where the fruit is. And then I will remember, what do you think about chia seeds?

Patryce (10:45): It's a huge fan, but I, a friend that introduced me years ago to we just put... She just puts it every morning in some water or juice, just add a small amount and let them become a little gelatin like and drink it.

Shonda (10:58): Yeah, they do. Chia pudding is popular for those who like chia seeds. So I'll make sure and find a good recipe for that. If anyone wants to try that recipe. Um, but just like flax seeds, they both have the good fatty acids. They're both some that I had to get, get an acquired taste for.

Patryce (11:20): I can see that. I can see that.

Shonda (11:23): They're really different. So when you start, you just may want to sprinkle a little in here and there, or use it as an egg replacement and you will not really taste the flaxseed flavor that way.

Patryce (11:37): But what about the chia seeds. Do do those come grounded too or no?

Shonda (11:42): You know, I don't think I've ever seen she chia seeds grounded. Yeah. I think most chia pudding, just like an addition or whatever into a treat or smoothie or on top of oatmeal and things like that.

Patryce (11:58): And did you mention hemp seeds?

Shonda (11:59): I didn't.

Patryce (12:00): Oh, okay. Those... That's one other seed that we have in the past to throw into our smoothie. That's the only way I used them. And they're great that way. Um, maybe I should look into other ways to incorporate them into our diet, but they're actually, you know, they're, they're good for you as well. They seem to have a lot of my magnesium.

Shonda (12:19): And they do have a good flavor. You know, I don't have any, but you know, now I may want to get some to add to oatmeal because I'm always telling people they're like, I'm busy. I don't have time. You know, oatmeal is like a staple breakfast for me. I'm busy in the morning. You know, I can get more creative later or more adventurous in my food, but in the morning, I'm just ready to get to work on my projects. I mean, think about all the berries we've talked about, all the nuts and seeds. There's such a variety that we can do with oatmeal by adding different nuts or different seeds or different fresh berries or dried berries and things to have a different oatmeal everyday.

Patryce (13:04): Yeah. That's good. Especially with this weather this time of year, it's a warm, hot cereal and we overlook that. And now that I think about, I used to eat it a lot and I've just forgotten about it. But now that we're talking about seeds and berries and nuts, it's time for me to bring out the oatmeal again. And I like the steel cut

Shonda (13:24): And steel cut is very easy in the InstantPot, just a plug for InstantPot, because I love my InstantPot.

Patryce (13:32): I hear you. It's a great way to make sure you get your berries in and oatmeal itself is good too, because it's, uh, high in fiber too.

Shonda (13:42): High in fiber. Yes.

New Speaker (13:44): Because also when I've had it in the past, now that you've mentioned, I'm still full. So you tend to not overeat the rest of the day. That's just been my experience. So anyway, I think it's a great idea, especially with the holidays coming up to get creative, or just start doing the oatmeal and see how that goes.

Shonda (14:04): Yeah. That's a good idea. So I guess we just like to invite you to try to incorporate more berries and seeds in your diet. If you know that there's room for improvement in that area. There will definitely be show notes full of ideas. So there we have it, we've completed the G-BOMBS series. We just want to remind you that this is just a great acronym to incorporate healthy foods into your diet and ways that you can remember. Did I have all my G-BOMBS today? [Yes.] We hope you're entering a great holiday season...

Patryce (14:40): We hope that you found something interesting or something that you'd like to try out yourself and again, share it with others so we can all begin the journey of just incorporating healthy foods into our diet. And one way is using the G-BOMBS.

Shonda (14:51): Yeah. Remember the G-BOMBS. Let's all... I invite you all to join me on my morning oatmeal.

New Speaker (15:01): I'm going to. Count me in.

Shonda (15:03): Thanks for listening. We hope you enjoy today's podcast. Remember you can catch show notes and additional details@realfoodanddrinks.com under the podcast menu. Also subscribe to our podcast. If you aren't already a member of our community. And if listening through anchor, please send us a message of topics you would like to hear us have conversations about until next time. Let's just be real.

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Podcast Episode 13 – Immunity – The ‘O’ and ‘M’ in G-BOMBS

Onions and Mushrooms

‘O’ is for onions and ‘M’s is for mushrooms in the acronym G-BOMBS. Using onions and mushrooms in preparing our foods not only adds great flavors but are also healthy ways to support our immune system.

G-BOMBS defined: G = Greens, B = Beans, O = Onions, M = Mushrooms, B = Berries, and S = Seeds.

OTHER WAYS TO SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN:
iTunes Logo Breaker Logo Google Podcasts Logo OverCast Podcasts Logo Pocket Casts Logo Radio Public Podcasts Logo Spotify Logo RSS Feed Logo Anchor

We invite you to listen and share your perspectives with us too. Send us a recorded message through Speakpipe. We may use your message in an upcoming episode, therefore, please leave your name if you would like it to be noted during the podcast. Leave an email address if you would like a personal response or feel free to use the contact form.

If you haven’t done so already, download the Delicious “No-Fail” Salads Guide – another great way to eat those GREENS!

Show References & Additional Notes:

Quick Pickled Onions

Mushroom Soup (Video Recipe)

Homemade Honey Cough Syrup

“Thank you” to Dawn. Dawn is my live-streaming friend I mention in this episode who introduced me to the concept of G-BOMBS.

Dr. Fuhrman

Shonda (00:00): Start from the heart. I mean, you know, I mean, really why are we doing this? Because, you know, we, we have, uh, discovered something that we think is great, right?

Shonda (00:21): Hi and hello. Welcome to the real food and drinks lifestyle podcast. We're building a community to talk about nutrition, lifestyle choices, and just feeling better. This is Shonda and this is Patryce. Let's just be real. [inaudible] Here's our disclaimer. We do not officially practice in any of the various subjects that we discuss. We are only sharing our personal experiences with you to a healthier lifestyle. Please do your own research before taking part in any of these practices.

Shonda (01:08): I think I was on, um, one of my live streaming with some friends and just chatting through the chat and trying to get some ideas for what to talk about or what to do videos about. And one just mentioned G-BOMBS. You know, she said G-BOMBS and I had to go look it up because, you know, even though I've been eating G-BOMBS forever and for really a really good three years since I've adopted the whole food plant-based diet, I mean, that's all that it is, you know, and mushrooms make things taste good, you know? So that was always thrown in there and onions and things like that. And you know, I know greens, give me energy. What else is there? And the beans, I just love beans. I just love the taste. So, you know, everything I've been eating is the G-BOMBS.

Shonda (01:55): So I'm like, okay, well I'll present it this way. That's why we're bringing all of this to you. And we just want to share on ways that we have discovered on how to eat in a healthy way, or is it helpful way? I don't know what, but.

Patryce (02:11): I would say both, healthy and helpful. I had never heard of G-BOMBS until you mentioned that not too long ago, but that my husband had actually heard about them. And I think it's just a great way to remind people of ways we can incorporate healthy food daily by just remembering what G-BOMBS stands for and we've already covered greens and beans. And today I think we are covering mushrooms and onions. Right? [Right.] Yeah. Mushrooms I've always liked them like yourself and continue to like mushrooms. There are so many out there, but it wasn't until we started thinking about G bombs and what to talk about that I researched the mushrooms more and learned that they are very

Patryce (03:00): Very ealthy. And what, I mean, by that is that they have been associated with decreased risk of breast cancer , stomach and cancer of the colon. Wow. And there was even a Chinese study that I think Dr. Oz mentioned Joan Lunden as well as Dr. Furhman. I think all three of them cited them somewhere. They talked about this same Chinese study, a women who ate at least 10 grams of fresh mushrooms each day. That's about one mushroom per day, had a 64% decrease risk of breast cancer.

Shonda (03:42): Wow. That's a powerful little thing. Isn't it? If it's just one mushroom.

Patryce (03:48): Exactly. And I'm just like, wow, how did I not know about this?

Shonda (03:55): Yeah. And actually though I just read today though, that I think Dr. Furhman who came up with the G-BOMBS, uh, acronym, I think he recommends that they are always cooked for some reason. But, you know, I really don't. I used to study the nutrition part, you know, about all these foods. And so I'm glad you like to do that part and that you bring that for us because now I'm just like, just eat, just eat everything and just eat as much as you can and you will get the nutrition that you need, you know, so, But, um, so, you know, and, and, and when we're talking about plant-based food, I mean, it's always good to eat a mixture of raw and cooked vegetables. You know, sometimes eat them cooked the same vegetables, sometimes eat them raw. So I think that by doing that, we get the full benefit of, um, the vegetable itself. So.

Patryce (04:55): That's a really good point because when I read fresh, I didn't know, they meant fresh and steams. Fresh and sauteed? Did they mean raw. [Right. Yeah.] It wasn't a hundred percent clear. Um, and, and just from personal experience, I will eat raw mushrooms, but most, most of the time I have sauteed them, I've cooked them to some degree. Um, maybe not even a lot, but I seldom eat the raw mushrooms. I think it's fine. Like you said, to have some raw, but, um, definitely with mushrooms, I found them more palatable by stir-frying them or doing different roasting or what have you, or grilling them all different ways of eating them. Um, so I was just, again, blown away by that information about breast cancer. I really like some people out there, you know, some of us like mushrooms, but we don't go out of our way to eat them. And that that's been something that I'm going to start going out of my way to incorporate mushrooms on a more regular basis.

Shonda (06:01): Yeah. I usually I buy them every week and sometimes though it's like the end of the week and I'm like, Oh my goodness, I have these mushrooms in here. So I'm trying to cut around, you know, I'm left with them. So what I'm going to do now is just make sure that, you know, when Friday's my grocery day, when I buy those mushrooms, that's the day that I'm going to probably cook the mushrooms. And actually now we just got a food saver so I can actually seal them back up. And that was really nice for this week. This is the first week I, I resealed the mushrooms. So that's, um, um, money saving tips there, you know? Um, so yeah. Now what do you think is going to be your favorite? You know, what do you think you're going to do with mushrooms now? I know you just told me a little bit, but are there any new recipes you have in mind?

Patryce (06:53): Well, actually, I, I, I've been eating a mushroom. Maybe you can call it a casserole, uh, similar to one, but basically it's just like mushrooms. And again, there's so many, they're the portabella, they're the oyster ones. They're the, there are several types of mushrooms and maybe we can have those in show notes later, list some of those out for you, but, um, just slicing some mushrooms and adding some tofu. And then a nice little sauce, uh, more of an Asian inspired sauce. You can make one yourself, um, instead of soy-based I use that coconut amino acid, um, and some ginger, but anyway, uh, an Asian inspired sauce over the slice mushrooms with, uh, some tofu and then maybe some brown rice.

Shonda (07:49): Okay. That sounds good. Kind of like a stir fry.

Patryce (07:52): And add some greens on top of that. Some spinach or kale, and I'll have a meal right there. I've been doing that. And then adding some chick, well hummus on the side. That's been tasty. But there's so many other things actually, uh, I didn't make it, but my stuffing, I looked at a recipe. You can make a stepping with mushrooms. Also, you can make, uh, instead of your traditional stew, (instead of) a beef stew, I saw a recipe using mushrooms and it looked similar to a beef stew and I haven't made that one yet, but that's another thing I'm encouraged, I mean, I'm looking forward to making a stew with mushroom and then also there's, you can just, I often just, uh, put some vinaigrette, some salt pepper, or that Bragg's seasoning I like to use and throw them in the oven and roast them, have them at the side.

Shonda (08:47): Oh yeah. I roasted some today with some potatoes and just everything. I did that sheet pan roasting. I did that today. Um, but you know, I think about when I may have initially started on my, um, plant-based diet, I would substitute the larger portobellos for like burgers, you know, grill them cause they're so big and thick, so that's a good, nice way. You know what I think I'm going to have that this weekend. What we're going to talk about also are the onions and I've made like a, uh, uh, gravy using mushroom and onions. And I have this specific recipe that I want to share. I'll put in the share notes, uh, and it's going to be a link to a video. And, uh, I made it about a month ago and my daughter really liked it that she asked for the recipe and she and her friend were going to try and make it, I don't think they were successful because something happened. I cannot remember what happened, but, uh, anyway, she was really, they, she really liked it. So I'll definitely put that one there. Um..hmm.

Patryce (09:56): And then I'm wondering, especially for onions, are they better to eat cooked some or raw or, or is it, you know...

Shonda (10:08): I think just like with any other vegetable, we should just do both because I've heard some people complain with their raw....I guess some people who have acid reflux.

Shonda (10:20): Yeah. Yeah. So yeah, cook them if they don't do well raw, but some lighter ones that you could eat that are raw would be like green onions, the tips of green onions.

Patryce (10:32): Oh, I forgot about those. Yeah, the green onions, very tasty and very good raw,.

Shonda (10:38): You know, sometimes I use green onions in place of a regular onion when I make, um, guacamole. Yeah. [That's a good idea.] Yeah. That gives it another taste. So onions include, you know, it's not just onions a round bulb of onions, but, uh, also leeks is in that same group. Um, garlic, chives, shallots, and scallions. Um, they're all in the same family, this family, you know, the onion group has, um, beneficial effects on the cardiovascular and immune system. And of course, as well as anti-diabetic and anti-cancer effects. So I think that it just helps with ...these help mostly with like detoxifying, you know, and also I think they, I know garlics are, are great, uh, prebiotic, which feeds the good bacteria in your gut. So, you know, it promotes a good colon health, you know, good stomach and digestive system health.

Patryce (11:51): Oh, that's important.

Shonda (11:54): Yeah. Let's not forget about the onions. And I do think that, you know, when, you know, when you really slow roast onions or slowly cook them, they do become sweeter. You know, there may be someone out there that's not aware that they how sweet they become. I love cooked onions.

Patryce (12:14): I forget to do it sometimes. But, um, I definitely like them somewhat uh, what do you..you said...caramelized. Very good on sandwiches. They're just good.

Shonda (12:28): I mean, we throw, uh, we throw onions in everything, right. I mean, you know, salads, or even when we make, like, I make like the chickpea salad, you know, it's just a really good flavor enhancer. I love both, um, you know, onions and garlic. I don't use the shallots or the scallions as much. Sometimes if there's a specific recipe, I may use it, but um, not really. Oh, and you know what, let's see here. One thing also, I know many people have heard of this, um, uh, onions are high, have high concentrations of quercetin. Are you familiar with quercetin?

Patryce (13:12): Is that for pain? or...

Shonda (13:12): Sometimes, you know, a lot of people go for quercetin when they have allergies.

Patryce (13:19): Oh, the shots?

Shonda (13:20): No, they're little..they're... You can buy quercetin, a quercetin supplement and it's good for anti-inflammatory, um, you know, as good as an anti-inflammatory. And I know a lot of people that use it, I think I used to use it when I had seasonal allergies. I would go for the quercetin.

Patryce (13:41): Um, I didn't know about that.

Shonda (13:45): Yeah. So seasonal allergies?... Go eat some onions.

Patryce (13:53): Well, speaking of onions...it's a little off topic, but it's still pertaining to onions, I know I have actually sliced onions and put them on the soles of our feet. And I know... When did we start? Anyway, you mentioned earlier about being a detoxifier. And I think when you have a cold or...It seemed to really help the kids and I experimented myself, but it sounds odd, but you just put a couple rounds on the bottom of your feet with a sock. Similar to how people do that, uh, vapor...what do you call that?

Shonda (14:34): The Vicks vapor rub.

Patryce (14:37): That the onions, it seems like it really calms those colds and helps you get over it faster.

Shonda (14:45): Uh hmm, well, let me tell you that I used to make, I'm trying to think of what..., When Erin would get sick, even as a child, you know, young, you know, prior to teens, uh, and even now she will take it, but I would make..., I would do similar. It must be similar to, I'm going to put a pickled onion recipe link there, but I used to do, um, was it just onions or did I do onions and garlic? I would put onions in a, in a shallow dish and cover with honey and kind of mush it and just sit it out on the, on the countertop. Yes. And just kind of mush it and let all the juices get into the honey and feed it to her as a syrup when she had a cold or respiratory...

Patryce (15:33): That was really helpful. And then the syrup is good for your throat.

Shonda (15:40): So there we go. Anti-inflammatory right?

New Speaker (15:42): Yeah. Oh my goodness. Okay. See, we can do that instead of the cough syrup...[laughs]

Shonda (15:48): Yeah, instead of cough syrup. Actually, I have some in my fridge and, um, it's been there probably about a year. I can't remember if she had something or whatever it was right before COVID so, or may have been right before we realized COVID was there and we had something. Cause you know, um, we do think that we may have had COVID already. Not sure. Have not been checked yet. If we get checked, are you, would you ever get, are you going to get checked for, for the antibodies?

Patryce (16:22): I would like to, but some people say that after six months you don't have the antibodies anymore. I don't know.

Shonda (16:28): Yeah. That's possible. So well, it's been over six months, but anyway, we did. And, and sometimes, you know, just like I go in and have sauerkraut, the sauerkraut or kimchi have onions in them too. I've put, uh, onions in kimchi. Of course that makes it spicy. Onions and garlic. And so yeah, sometimes I just, you know, kind of try and listen to my body and say, Ooh, I may feel a little something in my throat or something like that. And then I'll just go and have a teaspoon or tablespoon of kimchi with onions, you know, or, you know, I may just pass by that syrup and have a little bit, even though that syrup is just preserved, it's just, it's just like doing, um, a fermented food and it's just in the fridge. So it's going to last forever and it's in honey. So, you know, honey is a preservative anyway, it preserves things. So, uh, it's in the fridge, I guess, ready to go.

Patryce (17:29): No, I did not. I used to give the kids a little bit of honey during that... When you get a cold, because our doctor finally said, you know, in England, they don't even prescribe cough syrup immediately. They prescribe a bit of honey. But now that you're mentioning this whole idea with the onion, that's the way to go in the future. I think you need something like that. I will definitely do that. And you, mentionedthat garlic is in the same family. I know my aunt, uh, she's now in her 60's or 70's, but way back when ... she used to roast garlic almost every other night and she would just eat cloves of roasted garlic. And she just...she seldom got sick. I wonder now if that was helpful for her all those years, back in the eighties and seventies even.

Shonda (18:21): Yeah. I've read, you know, that garlic is a natural antibiotic. So, um, yeah, I do. I like a fresh salad, especially a Tex-Mex salad. I can just take a clove and just mince it on my salad and mix it in and eat it. I like it like that too.

Patryce (18:39): Well that, you know, I've gotten used to this whole fermented black garlic and that's my garlic. It's softer and it's sweeter. Um, I hope it's just as good for you. I know it's not bad for you. But, and now I'm getting hungry.

Shonda (18:55): Yeah. I know. It's like we can almost smell it, right?

Patryce (18:58): Yeah. Yeah.

Shonda (19:02): So yeah, we just want to, um, continue to encourage everyone to add more onions and mushrooms to your diet.

Patryce (19:11): And wow! They are, they have anti-cancer properties and who doesn't want some of that in their diet?

Shonda (19:19): Yeah. These are kind of like maybe like the power, power foods of the plant-based diet, although they they're all anti-cancer because you know, they all have different properties. I just always go back to eat a variety, just continue to eat a variety, whatever you're eating, maybe you, whatever you prepare, maybe you don't readily go for the mushrooms or onions, you know, at this point, but try adding some of that to your dishes that you're making. And I'm sure many people using garlic and onions, cause that's just kind of a given isn't it? This kind of like a basis first.

Patryce (19:58): It is. But that's why I'm so excited that we did talk about mushrooms too. And that they're part of G-BOMBS because people, like I said, I love mushrooms, but it's not something I generally go out of my way. You know, when you're out and you're ordering, you're like, Oh, mushrooms can be added? You add it. But now maybe more people like myself included will be intentional about adding mushrooms. So everyone spread the word about mushrooms and onions. And just remember G-BOMBS they're worth incorporating all of these into our everyday diet.

Shonda (20:32): Yes. Every day,!

Shonda (20:33): Hey, we hope you've been enjoying the G-BOMBS series. Next week we will have our final episode regarding G-BOMBS in which we will be discussing berries and seeds.

Shonda (20:50): Thanks for listening. We hope you enjoy today's podcast. Remember you can catch show notes and additional details@realfoodanddrinks.com under the podcast menu. Also subscribe to our podcast. If you aren't already a member of our community. And if listening through anchor, please send us a message of topics you would like to hear us have conversations about until next time. Let's just be real.

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Podcast Episode 12 – Immunity – The First ‘B’ in G-BOMBS

First B of G-BOMBS

Today we discuss the first ‘B’ IN G-BOMBS which stands for BEANS! We talk about some of our favorite beans, how we prepare them, and their health benefits. Stay tuned for all the episodes. G-BOMBS defined: G = Greens, B = Beans, O = Onions, M = Mushrooms, B = Berries, and S = Seeds.

Click here to listen to the podcast about the ‘G’ in G-BOMBS if you haven’t yet.

OTHER WAYS TO SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN:
iTunes Logo Breaker Logo Google Podcasts Logo OverCast Podcasts Logo Pocket Casts Logo Radio Public Podcasts Logo Spotify Logo RSS Feed Logo Anchor

We invite you to listen and share your perspectives with us too. Send us a recorded message through Speakpipe. We may use your message in an upcoming episode, therefore, please leave your name if you would like it to be noted during the podcast. Leave an email address if you would like a personal response or feel free to use the contact form.

If you haven’t done so already, download the Delicious “No-Fail” Salads Guide – another great way to eat those GREENS!

Show References & Additional Notes:

Grilled Hummus and Eggplant Stack

Kathmandu Stew

“Chicken” Salad or Vegan “Tuna”

Black Bean Sweet Potato

YouTube: Gut Health and Your Microbiome (Dr. Baxter Montgomery / Houston, TX)

Article: Soy Linked to Breast Cancer Survival

Dr. Fuhrman

Speaker 1 (00:10): Hi and hello. Welcome to the real food and drinks lifestyle podcast. We're building a community to talk about nutrition, lifestyle choices, and just feeling better. This is Shonda and this is Patryce. Let's just be real. [inaudible] Here's our disclaimer. We do not officially practice in any of the various subjects that we discuss. We are only sharing our personal experiences with you to a healthier lifestyle. Please do your own research before taking part in any of these practices.

Shonda (01:01): Today you know where we are we're since we're discussing G-BOMBS, um, we're on the first letter B in G-BOMBS, which stands for beans. So, um, we'd like to share with our guests and listeners ways that we enjoy beans, um, and how beneficial they are to us. But we're just going to do a quick little review on what, on, on what we discovered about greens.

Patryce (01:34): So yes, like Shonda said, last week, we talked about how healthy leafy green vegetables are and how they're loaded with vitamins and minerals and fiber yet they're low in calories. And some of the, the, vegetables we talked about, the greens ones were kale and microgreens, collard greens, spinach, and cabbage, and these are all different green vegetables that you can enjoy as well as, um, feel like you're eating something healthy because they are healthy and have lots of benefits. So if you need reminders of what those benefits are, you can check out the podcast, uh, from the website, real food and drinks, or, uh, any of the different podcasts providers like anchor. So yeah, that, that, that was it for the greens.

Shonda (02:29): Yeah, that was, that was fun. And, uh, you know, we talked a little bit about beet tops and some other things, so yeah, go on and head out there and, uh, give it a listen. I think you'll enjoy it.

Patryce (02:42): So what are we talking about today, Shonda?

Shonda (02:45): Well, today we're going to focus on beans and legumes. And one thing I did not focus on or intend to focus on, but just know that the, um, peanut is a legume yet. There are some issues with peanuts at times, you know, um, actually it could, it's more popular to have mold in peanuts and things like that. So we're just going to sit peanuts to the side. Okay. Because I'm sure everyone mostly have had peanut butter, you know, or maybe even know someone that's allergic to peanuts. So, um, but we're, I'm going to switch it and talk about, um, really beans, beans that you cook that require cooking to eat. And I guess this time I'll go over some of my favorites and then produce, you can add some of yours or talk about these same ones and different ways you like to, um, have them as a meal or add them to a meal.

Patryce (03:50): Sounds good.

Shonda (03:52): Okay. So first I want to talk about, I think I'll talk about tofu and tempeh first. [Okay.] Um, as we know, or you may not know, but tempeh and tofu is a processed food, but it can be processed in a healthy way. So I even, um, want to give it a try at making my own tofu because it involves taking dried, soy beans, soaking them, and, you know, there's this whole process and I'm really eager to do it, but the problem is I have not found any dried, soy beans, soy soybeans, and, you know, I'm thinking, well, could I use like maybe the ones that I get frozen, so I'm not sure about that, but it is a process food, but it can be processed in a good way. The controversy sometimes with tofu, it has a bad rap. Um, some say that, uh, it can cause cancer.

Shonda (04:58): Whereas when we look at the research and evidence out there, actually, and I'll see if I can particularly find one of those or atleast, um, link up another video where PCRM talks about this issue. Um, it's usually that the tofu is GMO. You know, it's genetically modified and not organic. So when I look for tofu, I go for organic and that takes care of the GMO part too. I like to do it in, um, add them to stir fries. And then I really don't fry my vegetables, but that's what you would think about a as the best flavor. And I'm just about to get a tofu press. That's going to help me press the water. You want to press the water out so that when you marinate it, it will soak up the juices of the marinade that you add to it. So it can be very, it can be roasted in the oven, yes along with vegetables, uh, or like I say, fried in a pan, it can be fried in a pan, but, um, it's really tasty.

Shonda (06:11): I think, um, you can make it tasty anyway. And I, I just enjoy it. It does have high amounts of calcium, actually. I think it's the way it's processed that adds the calcium though specifically, but I believe beans are high in calcium. Um, and so the other form of tofu of soy beans that I like, or that I'm learning to like is tempeh and tempeh is a fermented tofu. So after it's turned into tofu, no, it's actually the, the beans are actually fermented actually. And, um, now my problem with it, um, initially was that it was, it would upset my stomach and I guess it has something I, well, I used to suffer with IBS. And so it's not ideal while you're having IBS symptoms, but now that I've gotten rid of the IBS, I'm able to tolerate it. And it really doesn't do much of anything to me. Now I'm dealing with the bitterness of tempeh because I find that it's very bitter. I don't know. Have you tried it portray, so you think

Patryce (07:26): Actually I've tried it at a restaurant and I really liked it then went and bought some at a store and did not like that form of it when I had it at the restaurant, you know, how people eat? Uh, I think it's the BLT, a bacon, lettuce and tomatoes sandwich. This was with tempeh being the bacon and lettuce and tomato on some type of, I forget the kind of bread, but that way it was very tasty. So they prepared it like six strips of bacon almost. And it wasn't fried but big, but it was really good, but doing at home and my, what I purchased, it was not the same.

Shonda (08:04): Okay. So something that I've recently learned about tempeh is that it's best to steam it for at least 15 minutes before you start to incorporate it in your dish. Oh, this will cut down on some of the bitterness. And I tried it just a couple of days ago, and it really was a better dish. I still, I still had a hint of bitterness. So that means I probably could have just steamed it a little bit longer or marinated it. I really did not marinate it. I just kind of went for it because it was time to eat. But, um, I like, I enjoyed it better. It, you know, it has like, uh, so tofu can be a little soft and mushy. Yeah. It can be a little soft and mushy, but uh, tempeh has, um, texture that's good. It's kind of like a, kinda like a nutty kind of thing.

Shonda (09:02): And, you know, I mean, it's, it's a bean or legume or whatever it is. And, uh, so that's what it reminds me of. And I really prefer that texture in my dish. So I'm working on tempeh and when I get it perfected, I will let y'all know.

Patryce (09:19): That sounds good. That sounds good. Going back to the tofu, um, I've heard you mentioned, and I've had it once or twice, scrambled. Oh yeah, yeah, As opposed to eggs.

Shonda (09:34): Yeah, that is very tasty. And actually have I posted that on the website yet, I'm not sure. Um, there is, I have a video. I know it's ready. Cause I do, I do the tofu scrambles all the time. And I even have I got from, I think nutrition studies dot org, they have a tofu scramble, um, power seasoning or something like that. And I really like to put that one in my, uh, tofu scramble and it has like some nutritional yeast and like turmeric, you know, to make it a little yellow.

Shonda (10:07): And so I just stir fry that with, with vegetables and like I would an omelet, or, you know. It's a scramble, it's not going to fry up like an egg really. Although there is one product out there, but it has way too many ingredients for me. I have tried it, but so maybe if you're taking the little steps, you know, and you don't have any real chronic diseases issues is not your causeto do it. You could try Just Egg. But if you are doing this diet, if you're making changes to your diet and you have some issue, I would not recommend Just Eggs because it has, has too many added ingredients to it.

Patryce (10:51): Well, it sounds like just that tofu scramble is a great way to just try tofu.

Shonda (10:56): Yeah. And that product too is high in salt. Whereas when you make your own tofu scramble, you know, there's no salt.

Shonda (11:02): So I think that's it for tofu and tempeh. Um, so I'll, I'll breeze through these other ones right here. Uh, almost because, so this was this, this is going to be the next, uh, one that I really enjoy. So I probably have a lot to say about it and that is chickpeas or garbanzo beans. Now chickpeas, um, are just my favorite because I like the taste. I like the texture. They're easy to flavor because usually when I cook them, I cook them without adding any - even I don't even add salt or seasoning when I cook the chickpeas. And so let's go about ... Let me talk about briefly how I cook chickpeas. I cooked chickpeas, you know, that you can get them in cans, but for that same dollar that you buy a can of chickpeas, you know, in a rush, I can maybe keep one in my pantry, but I buy a whole pound and I dump them in my IstantPot.

Shonda (12:06): Well, you can dump it in your InstantPot, straight from the dried seed. And, um, just put, you know, some water about an inch water over it, or maybe two. And, and I think it takes about 25 minutes from the dried bean, but if, yeah, but if you soak it overnight, that's cut down to about 15 minutes. [Wow.] Yeah. And, um, you know, it takes some time for the machine to heat up and then release the pressure. Although you could always just release the pressure, but I usually just like to let the IntantPot release its own pressure. Um, but, um. Oh, pre-soaking removes the phytic acid found in beans and phytic acid can irritate the stomach or cause discomfort. So soaking is a really good idea, especially if you want to throw them from the soaked, you know, being into a soup or, you know, something that you're going to make and ...Hey, y'all I cook everything in the IntantPot.

Shonda (13:16): So, um, that, uh, is just something that I do. But so if you don't pre-soak, you should throw away the water that the beans are cooked in for the most part of any bean, except for the chick pea. Now I haven't had any issues with, with the chick pea water and I use chick pea water in a lot of different dishes too. Um, I've used it, um, for fun and making things like meringue an egg free meringue. Uh, it can whip up and get fluffy, just like an egg can. So any place that you would use an egg, you can substitute chick pea water. So that's a really good key. I really liked doing that. Um, you know, and when I'm making pancakes or something, I may use a flax seed egg, which has taken ground flax and adding it to water and let it gel.

Shonda (14:18): And then, but usually sometimes I use chick pea water to even give it an extra boost in place of plain water. So that's how I use the leftover water from chickpeas, but still, usually I remove the chickpeas from the water, rinse them. I will put them in a bag like a gallon size bag and um, let them cool a bit in the fridge. And then I just transfer them to the freezer. Now actually I do this to all the beans that I cook, except for one the other one that I'm going to talk about and that's lentils in a bit, but I do freeze all the chickpeas and they, when you remove the liquid and rinse them, they will freeze pretty much separately. Or you can just kind of bang the bag and then you will, um, you can just use as many as you need. It's like having, you know, your own canned product, but it's in the freezer and it's ready. So that's how I do all my beans.

Patryce (15:16): Wow. I had no idea that you could freeze them. That's a game changer. [Yeah. Yeah.]

Shonda (15:24): Bags, gallon bags of beans stored in my freezer. So it's ready all the time. Whether, you know, if someone came and I needed to make a soup for everyone, I mean, I'd just bring out the beans, you know, and throw some vegetables in there. And I like tomato-based soups. Those are my favorite. Um, but the other things I do with chickpeas or garbanzo beans is make hummus. I know you like hummus.

Patryce (15:48): Yes. Good stuff. [Yeah. ]

Shonda (15:51): I make hummus. Um, and I'm sure I have a recipe posted already on the website. Um, and I add them to bowls and I even like them in Italian flavor, dishes and Asian flavor dishes. Those are the two that I usually go for the garbanzo beans in are those two. Oh. And let's not forget about the chickpeas tortillas.

Patryce (16:18): Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. Good stuff too. Okay. Oh, I'm sorry. What were you saying?

Shonda (16:24): No, I was just going to say, because I can't eat breads or wraps or readily buy them. I have, I searched and I searched until I found a solution and chickpea tortillas is something that I make and you can buy chick pea flour in the grocery store, but I like to use fresh chickpeas in my recipe. I put fresh chickpeas with about just about half, as much of the tapioca flour in there and, uh, some water or some more chickpea flour, um, chickpeas aquafaba and just blend it up and make it into a dough, press them out. And they're just ready to go.

Patryce (17:06): Hmm. Sounds good.

Shonda (17:10): So, um, I'll just briefly go over these next three that I have here. Um, Pinto beans. I just liked the flavor, uh, and even red beans. Um, and so I use Pinto beans and black beans. Uh, even though I think I enjoy black beans, no Pinto beans, a little bit better. Pinto beans and black beans. I love Tex-Mex dishes. And so these are the two that I go for when I'm making a Tex-Mex meal or, you know, a taco, um, or, um, a soup, you know, black bean soup. Um, I do, um, quite not, not as often as I used to because I've just started using all these other beans. So I think that was like my intro bean was the black bean at one time. And in salads, Pintos and black beans, I even sometimes get, this is probably the only place except for Jason's deli salad bar that I eat out is Chipotle. And I get the, um, black bean, like a bowl. And there's like, do you want Pintos or black beans? I'm like both.

Shonda (18:23): And I get that on top of Brown rice and their vegetables and their corn and salsa. And I bring it home, actually cut it in half, put half of it in another bowl with more greens, you know, and things like we talked about last week and that's a meal for me. So that's the way, uh, these are my top beans, except for there's one more lentils. Now I've even made some lentil tortillas, but they are not as good as the chickpeas tortilla. So as long as I can get money as on chickpeas, that's the one that I'm going to do. But I know I have a really old recipe on the website about a lentil. I think it's like called Kathmandu is that a place that's a place, right. A place I believe. Yeah. Stew. And it uses red lentils and it's kind of like a Curry or whatever.

Shonda (19:18): And it's really, Oh, I don't know if that one has coconut, but another thing that lentils. Okay. So red lentils will break up when you cook them. I mean, there's hardly no way to cook a red lentil without it breaking up. And so it, it can be used as a good thickener to soups. So I do that a lot. Sometimes I just add lentils into something that I want a thick soup with so that I don't have to over cook the other beans in the soup. Um, and it's quick and easy to cook a cook in about 20 minutes, either one of them, I think the lentils, the lentils take much less, but the green and the Brown lentils will cook in about 20 minutes on the stove top. Or it's probably about 10 minutes in the IntantPot.

Patryce (20:05): Wow. I need to get one of those.

Shonda (20:08): Yeah. Yeah. You do. You do. You really do so,

Shonda (20:14): Uh, I think I just about covered all of the different, uh, beans that I like to enjoy. I mean, I, sometimes I buy the bean mixes and just make a bean soup and, um, [Good idea.] Yeah. Do that too.

Patryce (20:29): Well. That's some great sharing, because it's a lot of great ideas and then finding out that you can freeze the garbanzo beans or chickpeas. That's a big piece of information, but also I'm just excited because we know that all these beans have a lot of protein. So a lot of times we have people who are not used to a plant-based or more vegetarian type diet, they'll be, Oh, your protein, you know, that's what you get that from your meat, but you can just remind them, Hey, all these beans have a lot of protein. And, and with that protein, uh, they don't have a lot of fat. So it's, it's a, win-win lots of protein, but not a lot of fat. So, um, I'm just excited about some of the ideas that you shared and, um, I I'm like you I'd like most of these as well.

Patryce (21:19): I have not done much with the tofu other than buying when I'm out, but I feel like that's the, I can educate myself more about, because there's different firmnesses. I did not realize that like there's a soft and a firm - all that stuff. So, uh, and it's very important to the flavor that I realized, because that's a good step when it's flavored well seasoned well, the tofu. So I want to experiment more with the tofu and I want to experiment more with like you, what you do is you make all your beans and I have to be honest, I I'm bad about buying either canned beans or, you know, you know, my, one of my favorite places is trader Joe's and they have, the humus already made up and so forth. But now was hearing you talk about how fast, the beans are in the IntantPot. I am encouraged that I can not only make them, but I can store them up. And then from that batch of frozen chickpeas that I can make a lot of stuff. I can make hummus. I can use it for a soup. So this is just encouraging. Yeah.

Shonda (22:31): Yeah. It makes really quick meals, you know, it's, it is kinda, I think about it as the meat substitute portion, uh, for, you know, the dishes that I make. I always, I usually always eat beans in something, you know. I may eat different amounts of beans, you know, depending on if I'm just adding them to a salad or whatever, but, um, yeah. Oh, and with the chickpeas, I've also made a chickpea tuna salad too.

Patryce (22:59): Oh, I wanted to try that. I saw the recipe, but I haven't made it yet. I do want to make that.

Shonda (23:04): I think they said you can make it like a chick pea, tuna, or chick pea chicken kind of thing. So, yeah, I do like those. And so I just like to, I know we probably already mentioned this, that, you know, beans have high levels of fiber. Yeah. Okay. So, um, beans have high amounts of fiber and resistant starch, which is, uh, carbohydrates that are not broken down by digestive enzymes. Okay. So when they are in, when they reached the intestines, they get gobbled up by bacteria and that's how can increase your gut microbiome. And you know that we have a, um, we're going to be watching this coming Monday. Let's see. No, it would have already happened. We're going to put a link to it. Dr. Baxter Montgomery is going to be talking about the gut microbiome on Monday. Definitely. So this has already happened. We will definitely put a link below in the show notes, but, um, yeah, intestinal bacteria and, you know, he can better explain it, but I'm just telling y'all fiber is good for your gut. It can protect colon cancer risk by 50%. So, um, you know, all these foods are high in fiber actually, you know, there are fiber foods, so that's why these are good foods and, you know, doing things like decreasing cancer, lowering cholesterol, uh, preventing food cravings.

Patryce (24:44): That's a good question. That's a good point. Fiber fills you up. So if you're looking at losing weight. That's another great way to do it. [Yeah, exactly.]

Shonda (24:54): Yeah, yeah. Oh, and, uh, anti-diabetes, because the, uh, carbs are digested more slowly than a refined carbohydrate. Yeah.

Patryce (25:06): That's very important. Considering in America, diabetes is definitely on the uptick. Wow. So this is all good information. And now that you've been talking, I just remembered another thing I've been doing recently with be because unlike you, I didn't really grow up eating a lot of beans other than I think some black items here and there. But, um, as an adult, I started discovering beans, but I love to, when I stopped doing the traditional baked potato, um, now I do mainly just sweet potatoes. And specifically we liked the Japanese ones here. Uh, they're very tasty, but you bake them just like you would, the old that the regular Idaho baked potatoes, but you bake the sweet potato. And then I load them up with, with the beans. [Right.] We are able to flavor, you know, whatever sauce, however you flavor your beans, but you can throw that on top of potato. And then some, some steamed broccoli. I have a full meal and I'm not hungry for a long time.

Shonda (26:06): Yeah. There was also a recipe out there. That's a Tex-Mex sweet potato broccoli. No, I don't know if I put broccoli in there, but it's in the recipe, but you, yeah. You can use any, any vegetables, additional vegetables that you'd like, so, yeah. And that was quite tasty. I had never done that really. Um, I put like garbanzo beans and broccoli on a baked potato, like a baked Irish potato, but this one was just the flavors, you know, I just love Tex-Mex food. I like Asian food too. But sometimes Asian food, uh, may require a little bit more sweetness, you know, a lot of the recipes. And so I like, I like, you know, I was just like Tex-Mex. I think I like spicy. I like spicy over sweet. Um, so yeah, we have a lot of recipes out there, so, uh, I'll link to some under the show notes and um, you have to try them. Yeah.

Patryce (27:07): Yes. Very good. I'm hungry now. [I know.] You know what, one of the thing I'm just thinking about cooking and food and now it's fall. In Winter chili is e a big deal, but you know, growing up, I did have a lot chili with the beef or whatever the meat was, but now, I make chili without the meat and I add sweet potatoes in my chili, with beans, lots of beans.

Shonda (27:33): Yes. And yeah. And sweet potatoes go well or potatoes go well in soups and chilis. So, you know, when you said that, do you know that when I used to buy this was like, okay, very long time ago, probably about 15 years ago, I used to buy chili in the can, but I never did like the chili in the can with the meat. It was like a hot dog uh, chili. And you know, what it was made with. And I have not tried it. It was made with beans and oats. [Oh.] That's what made the meaty texture were... what were the oldoat parts of that.

Patryce (28:13): Of the vegetarian chili?

Shonda (28:15): Yeah. Well, it wasn't advertised as vegetarian. I don't know what else was in there, but it did not have any meat. Oh, okay. Yeah. So I'm not sure, really. I need to go find that, but I am going to try that in my next chili, I'm going to try or try to find a recipe that uses. Yeah. It's, it's cold. I think it's time to try a chili with some of them.

Patryce (28:38): Yeah, I think so too. And I'm now thinking about this chili we used to make all the time, it's like a Paleo recipe, but you just can make it without the meat, but it's delicious. Flavors, flavors. And I suppose in the InstantPot you can make chili probably faster.

Shonda (28:58): Oh, you just dump it all in there and put the lid on and turn it on. And you're done.

Patryce (29:04): Wow. Not with my, no, I'm not that big, no...

Shonda (29:09): I do not have time to sit. I mean, you know, and I have a crock pot, but you know, the crock pot takes all day. And uh, I mean, that's okay if I start early enough, but usually I don't start early enough and I just dump it all in the IntantPot and walk a way from it. I don't, I can go to the grocery store, I can do anything I want. And it is there on the countertop, you know, safe. Um, if I'm leaving, I don't go that far. And usually someone's at the house. So just let them know it's on there, but can do it. You know, it's just as safe as the crock pot. Once you get it sealed, once it gets sealed, you know, and you know, you can verify that yours isn't having any issues. I use the Instapot almost every day.

Patryce (29:59): So that's good to know because we have a lot of people listening who probably have very busy lives, maybe working outside of home and children and just a lot going on. And that can be sometimes a deterrent, honestly, that was mine, you know, not enough time. And now hearing how quickly this InstantPot cooks some of the same favorite foods. I may want to cook again because honestly I think a lot of times people are just tired and they don't want to have to wait so long or spend so much time, but the way you're talking, you could have done it over the weekend or prep work and then just throw it in there and you are done.

Shonda (30:36): It's so simple. Yeah. So, okay. So, um, I think we're going to sum up beans, but of course, if you have any questions you can, uh, send us an email or there's a page, there's a link on the podcast page and it's called a SpeakPipe and you can actually send us a recorded voice message and that we can return, um, back to you.

Shonda (31:02): So that's it for beans, but stay tuned next week. We're going to be talking about the O in G-BOMBS and the O is for onions. And actually, you know, I think we're going to talk about onions. Oh yeah. We're going to talk about the Oh and the M yeah. We're going to talk about, Oh, for onions and M for mushrooms. Yum. So I know you've probably, you may have more experience with more mushrooms with your world travels.

Patryce (31:33): I just like mushrooms. I know that. So could talk about them. They're tasty. There's so many of them too.

Shonda (31:41): Right? Yeah. So stay tuned for that. That's going to be fun and we'll make sure we find some good ways to use, you know, onions, which you know, is just not onions. That's a big family of different foods. So stay tuned for that. And we will, um, be with you next time.

Speaker 1 (32:03): Thanks for listening. We hope you enjoy today's podcast. Remember you can catch show notes and additional details@realfoodanddrinks.com under the podcast menu. Also subscribe to our podcast. If you aren't already a member of our community. And if listening through anchor, please send us a message of topics you would like to hear us have conversations about. Until next time. Let's just be real.

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Podcast Episode 11 – Immunity – ‘G’ in G-BOMBS

Green Leafy Vegetables

G-BOMBS” is an acronym that you can use to remember the best anti-cancer, health-promoting foods on the planet. These are the foods that you should eat every day, making up a significant proportion of your diet. They are extremely effective at preventing chronic disease, including cancer, and promoting health and longevity. (Quoted by Dr. Joel Fuhrman)Today we discuss the ‘G’ IN G-BOMBS which stands for GREENS! We talk about some of our favorite greens, how we prepare them, and their health benefits. Stay tuned for all the episodes. G-BOMBS defined: G = Greens, B = Beans, O = Onions, M = Mushrooms, B = Berries, and S = Seeds.

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We invite you to listen and share your perspectives with us too. Send us a recorded message through Speakpipe. We may use your message in an upcoming episode, therefore, please leave your name if you would like it to be noted during the podcast. Leave an email address if you would like a personal response or feel free to use the contact form.

If you haven’t done so already, download the Delicious “No-Fail” Salads Guide – another great way to eat those GREENS!

Show References & Additional Notes:

Greens, Beans, Onions, and Mushrooms – G-BOMBS Part 1 (A quick meal)

Sauerkraut Recipe using cabbages

Sadhkin Cabbage – 3 Ways

Green Smoothie

Kale Chips

Shonda (00:00): G-BOMBS is an acronym that you can use to remember the best anti-cancer health promoting foods on the planet. These are the foods that you should eat every day, making up a significant proportion of your diet. They're extremely effective at preventing chronic disease, including cancer and promoting health and longevity. That's a quote from Dr. Joel Fuhrman. Today, we will be focusing on the G in G bombs, which stands for greens.

Shonda and Patryce (00:44): Hi and hello. Welcome to the real food and drinks lifestyle podcast. We're building a community to talk about nutrition, lifestyle choices, and just feeling better. This is Shonda, and this is Patryce. Let's just be real. Here's our disclaimer. We do not officially practice in any of the various subjects that we discuss. We are only sharing our personal experiences with you to a healthier lifestyle. Please do your own research before taking part in any of these practices.

Shonda (01:30): Hi Patryce. Here we are again, and we're back on our immune system series or our series of immunity. So today

Shonda (01:41): We're talking about, uh, the G part of G bombs, and I'm going to let you start Patryce telling us, um, well, just start anywhere. What, what, what, what are your favorite greens or, you know, you did any extra research to find out what's so good about them? I'll let you take it over from there.

Patryce (02:04): Excellent. Some of my favorite greens, I just started racking my brains about what I tend to gravitate to. And then I did start doing a little research to see how nutritionally packed the greens that I favor really are. And, uh, I was happy to learn that they aren't just tasty to me, but they're actually nutritious as well. And the first one, uh, that's been very, a favorite in our house is kale these days, K A L E. You can eat it raw or you can eat it sauteed. You can even make kale chips. And that was, I would think that's the top one.

Shonda (02:46): That's your top green? Okay. So yes. Do you prepare it all those different ways too?

Patryce (02:54): Yes, actually I do, but normally I, we eat it raw and to be honest, that's because it's the fastest way. And I know some people think of it as, um, a little chewier than they'd like, or what's the word, but what, what, what is important is that you also want to massage your raw kale if you don't want it so tough. And that just means putting the healthy oil of your choice and, and just basically doing just that, massaging it with your hands, your fingers. It's more tender, I suppose. But yeah, we usually eat it raw and I did learn that. Yes, it's great in all different forms, but by consuming it raw, you're getting the most, the most nutrition out of that.

Shonda (03:47): Okay. Yeah. So that sounds good. Anything else on kale? I, that, that's one of my favorites too, and it's exactly, for the same reasons

Patryce (03:56): Now that you asked anything else about ka-- if there's anything else about kale, I did find out that one cup of kale contains 684% of the, your daily value of vitamin K and then 206% of vitamin A and 134% ov Vitamin C's daily value.

Shonda (04:18): Wow, that's quite a bit,

Patryce (04:21): Okay. Another favorite would be greens and those many people may not know what those are, but they're basically immature greens produced from the seeds of vegetables and herbs. And, uh, the reason why, well, I became familiar with these going to the farmer's market. They offered some micro greens from one of the local farms, and I just liked them and you could eat them straight out of the container. And they're just a fast..., You can put them on your salads, make it, sell it from them, or just add them to your foods, which I did a lot of. And again, I looked those up and they have a lot of vitamin C, E and K.

Shonda (05:03): Okay. So where do you get your microgreens from now that you may not be visiting the, um, farmer's markets that much?

Patryce (05:11): That's a good point. Well, when I don't go to the farmer's market, uh, I have found them recently at Trader Joe's. So that's exciting. And they do say them micro greens are grown all year round, and that is actually something you might consider growing in your own kitchen or what have you. I've never done that, but I have been able to find them at Trader Joe's when I haven't made it to the farmer market. Uh, another one would be spinach, another yummy, a green leafy vegetable, and that one's high in K. Vitamin K a and manganese, That's it. Yes. Has manganese and folate and then cabbage and cabbage is really great in that... Now, you know, I grew up mainly on green cabbage, but you can also get purple and white and it's another very healthy, healthy green. And then I don't know if it's my favorite, but I did grow up on a lot of collard greens as a child. And my grandfather grew them a lot. And my mother, even now, my mother has a community garden where, uh, it's a neighborhood type garden. So she's able to get collard greens at times. And, uh, depending on how they're prepared, they can be delicious too.

Shonda (06:36): Right. Yeah. Or you can use them in as wraps cause their leaves grow so big.

Patryce (06:42): Ah, I never have. I've never done that.

Shonda (06:46): Oh yeah. That's my favorite way to eat those. You've never had to do it cause you, you could eat bread. Well, yeah, I think the important thing is to just, you know, we're, we're calling out all these different vitamins and minerals, but the key is to just eat a lot of greens and you'll get all the vitamins & minerals, you know, that, that they provide, uh, the way they are supposed to be provided in these whole foods. So that sounds good.

Patryce (07:16): I, I'm a big fan of beet and just found out recently that you can eat the, the leaf, the green Leaves of the beets. I've never done that, but apparently those are really good. So I just threw that out there as something to explore, but another very good one is bok choy. And sometimes it may be more challenging to find it because if you go to an Asian market, it's more plentiful, [right]. The bok choy, but those are quite tasty. I know stir frying them is really good.

Shonda (07:51): Yeah. Okay. So yeah, they are. I do, like, I like all of those and I have eaten beet greens. I have juiced beet greens and they are quite strong. Beet greens, um, they are very, um, green tasting, you know? No, actually they taste more like the beet. They're kind of like, um, the only thing I can think of is like a dirtier green, I don't know. But, um, you know, I would add them with a lot of different greens and not just one, you know, not just eat them alone.

Patryce (08:26): [Actually.].. I see that, that makes sense.

Shonda (08:29): Turnips and mustards are two of my favorite and, and you know, it's, it's odd that I usually only cook these in the winter months, but I think that's when they are more plentiful that when they actually grow. So, you know, it's kind of important, you know, there are some that say eat, eat in season. So right now I think most of the greens that you were talking about, or just let's say most greens are really in season in the cold months. I actually have some kale, uh, I have some growing in my garden right now and I'm telling you, these greens are really happy in the cold weather.

Patryce (09:13): Oh, good to know. [Yeah.]

Shonda (09:16): So, uh, yeah. And guess what, everyone, I started them from seed. I planted them...

Patryce (09:21): Congratulations.

Shonda (09:24): Yeah. That's been fun, so, [wow].

Shonda (09:28): Okay. So I think in the house here, um, my, uh, adult children, uh, may not be as adventurous, but they do eat romaine lettuce, you know? So that's one that, um, still has some good vitamins in it. I know it's vitamin A and K in there and you know, and they make really good crunchy parts in fresh salads, but actually speaking of crunch, did you already mentioned you did, you mentioned cabbage and I hadn't, I was unaware that there is a white cabbage. I definitely would pick it up if I ever found it, but I do use green and purple a lot in a salad, um, along with carrots. So, um, that's another good one. Now, um, or one that tastes pretty similar to the beet greens is uh Swiss Chard. Yeah. So they're another..., But they're so pretty. I mean, they're just pretty to me and that's why, that's why I buy them really.

Shonda (10:36): And, uh, I buy them cause they're pretty, you know, they're usually, you know, they can be, you know, they have the red veins and then green and then yeah. Some of it could be a little, uh, orange, you know, they're just so pretty. And so when I, when I, when I, when I'm in the store and I see them and they look really healthy and just colorful, I just, I can't help, but buy them and um, usually I do wilt those. Swiss Chard, you know, along with a grain or something, I like to wilt them or maybe cook them with a little garlic or something like that. But I think, um, yeah, all of these are good In Vitamin A and C and K and of course calcium, because we know that, you know, greens provide calcium for us.

Patryce (11:24): So True. So true. Can we go back to the cabbage? Because one other thing I remember you used to make a lot of sauerkraut and that is from cabbage.

Shonda (11:36): Exactly. Yeah. The purple kraut is everyone's favorite.

Patryce (11:40): Purple kraut. That's right. You did more of that than the green, or did you do green at all? I don't remember ...

Shonda (11:46): Green. And when I do green make the green cabbage, I like to make it, uh, and kimchi style, you know, or more spicy. And then the purple is sweet because it has pineapple added to it. And I do, I have some in my fridge and I had some, I think this morning, so yeah.

Patryce (12:08): Yeah. Well, that's another great use of cabbage because of the fermentation. That's very good for our gut health.

Shonda (12:15): Yeah. That kicks it up a notch.

Patryce (12:18): I do want to ask you, I'm sorry. I wanted to ask you about the Swiss Chard because I, now that you mention it, they do look very attractive, but for whatever reason, I not really prepared those. And I wondered is the taste very strong?

Shonda (12:34): Yeah. The taste of Swiss Chard is strong. Oh yeah, yeah. A little less, a little less bitter than a beet greens, but yeah, they are, um, they have a different texture too. When we know, I, I, like I said, I usually wilt them. So they do, they're, they're very tender, but strong at the same time. I don't know how to describe it. Yeah.

Patryce (13:04): I have to try them one day though. And I, now that I'm asking about some that I haven't tried, I'm curious for yourself or your family, have you juiced many of these because now that I think about it, the only ones I've ever used in like a smoothie or maybe a juice, but definitely smoothie are spinach and kale.

Shonda (13:25): Yeah. Those are two popular ones, but I have put just about everything in a smoothie. It's not like I do it all the time, but when I see them in there, I may just throw it in there and I don't throw it in the same quantities that I would, the spinach or the kale, just because, um, you know, spinach, it's not detectable at all kale's a little bit more tasty, but the others, you know, it may be half of a leaf or something like that when I throw it in there, uh, I have juiced beet greens and, um, uh, you don't want to do too much at a time. You want to mix it with another juice other than just the beets also. Um, I'm trying to remember what else have I juiced? I've juice cabbage. Really? Yeah. It's really good for IBS... Settling the stomach. You know, when I was talking about the colors that attract me to the, uh, Swiss Chard, um, we have to remember those colors are, what are the antioxidants? You know, those are the pigments, uh, that are, um, benefit us, you know, when we see those colors, those colors... And that's why if you've ever heard, you know, eat from the rainbow.

Patryce (14:46): Yes, I have. Yes.

Shonda (14:49): So, yeah. And so we should know that, uh, leaf leafy greens are not always green. Like you said, the cabbages white or the cabbages purple. Um,

Patryce (15:03): But you know what, maybe we can just also share that of course these are wonderful foods to eat because they are whole plant-based food, um, [natural], you know, not processed, but also realizing in addition, they're, they're just very beneficial to our health. And, and I had even learned that they can help reduce the risk of obesity and heart disease, high blood pressure, and even mental decline. Now I have to do more research about the mental decline, but that found that very interesting, um, that it could be helpful in that way.

New Speaker (15:47): Right? Yeah. That's what, that's where Dr. Fuhrman came up with, you know, putting these together. And that's a really neat way to think about it. I guess we could go ahead and tell everyone what all the GBOMBS are. You know, we were starting with greens this week and the others are, are beans, onions, mushrooms, berries, and seeds. So we're, we'll be talking about those things. And, uh, he does highlight that these are extremely effective at preventing chronic disease, including cancer and promoting health and longevity. I want to add that greens. I noticed I've even had, um, barley greens, barley greens as, um, like I did the wheat grass and also barley greens as a dry powder. I noticed that if I would add it, yeah. If I would add it to, um, my smoothies or even just drinking in water, it's just, there is something about greens that really help with detoxification. And so that your body's not having a hard time detoxifying, guess what? You're going to have more energy. Greens have always given me energy. So I know that at times when I'm feeling, you know, like lack luster, whatever, not a lot of energy, I'm like, Oh my goodness, where am I greens? You know? So, um, if energy doesn't get you to eat your greens, I don't know what will,

Patryce (17:23): Well, that's a very good point Shonda, because I was just telling my husband that I need to go back to my routine of having a salad every other day, if not every day, because it's just been a few days where I haven't had my salad. Sometimes I even have a salad for breakfast. And I just feel like it's a great way to start my day. And I... Now that you mentioned it. I do feel like it helps to keep my energy level up. But now that I've gone a few days without having my usual salad, whether it be kale or what have you, I do notice a difference. I don't feel, I feel even heavier. It's not even a matter of whether you look heavier or those scales says. It, it, it may be that reflected too in that way, but there's something about the whole energy level, um, by having those greens and maybe just, just keeping you, um, more detoxed naturally. So I'm going to experiment with that because it's been a few days that I have not had my salad on a regular basis.

Shonda (18:27): Okay. I'm going to check in with you tomorrow. So yeah, everyone look for that upcoming video on, uh, creating G bombs to be out soon. We're going to wrap it up today. Yeah. We hope you've enjoyed this and are encouraged to eat more greens. Green is my favorite color by the way.

Patryce (18:48): Oh, really? I'm not surprised.

Shonda (18:53): Thanks for listening. We hope you enjoy today's podcast. Remember you can catch show notes and additional details at RealFoodAndDrinks.com under the podcast menu. Also subscribe to our podcast if you aren't already a member of our community. And if listening through anchor, please send us a message of topics you would like to hear us have conversations about until next time. Let's just be real.

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Dr. Fuhrman

Podcast Episode 10 – Happy Thanksgiving & Gratefulness

Thankful

Today we just want to provide your with encouragement by reiterating what Real Food is all about. Thank you for being a listener (or viewer) of these podcast series. We are grateful to have you as part of our community. Happy Thanksgiving!

OTHER WAYS TO SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN:
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We invite you to listen and share your perspectives with us too. Send us a recorded message through Speakpipe. We may use your message in an upcoming episode, therefore, please leave your name if you would like it to be noted during the podcast. Leave an email address if you would like a personal response or feel free to use the contact form.

If you haven’t done so already, download the Delicious “No-Fail” Salads Guide.

Show References & Additional Notes:

Grateful Apps:

See Podcast Episode 8 – Thanksgiving Meal Planning for Thanksgiving recipes.

NOTE: There will not be a transcript for this episode.

“Thankful” Photo by Pro Church Media on Unsplash

Podcast Episode 9 – Real Solutions to Covid

Mask and Sanitizer

We truly had a REAL discussion about Covid-19 today. We discuss how we keep hearing about the number counts around the virus and that a vaccine will be available soon. BUT, we think it’s important to talk about other solutions available to us. And, of course, these solutions are focused on our food (real vs fake/chemical-laden), health, and even our doctors.

OTHER WAYS TO SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN:
iTunes Logo Breaker Logo Google Podcasts Logo OverCast Podcasts Logo Pocket Casts Logo Radio Public Podcasts Logo Spotify Logo RSS Feed Logo Anchor

We invite you to listen and share your perspectives with us too. Send us a recorded message through Speakpipe. We may use your message in an upcoming episode, therefore, please leave your name if you would like it to be noted during the podcast. Leave an email address if you would like a personal response or feel free to use the contact form.

If you haven’t done so already, download the Delicious “No-Fail” Salads Guide.

Show References & Additional Notes:

  1. The video snippets we were referring to in today’s show were mostly from this video:
    People are dying from viruses, here’s why that’s happening
  2. Here is another video that was also published this week by “Montgomery Heart & Wellness”. We think you will find some very thought-provoking information in this video also: The COVID-19 Vaccines is Here!… Does it and other vaccines work? Insights on Vaccines and other Treatments for Infectious Diseases
  3. I could not locate the actual snippet that was mentioned in our podcast regarding “How to Talk to Your Doctor”, yet here is another podcast by the same group, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine:  Why Won’t My Doctor Talk About My Diet?
  4. And I wouldn’t want you to miss this one either:  Covid-19 Update with Dr. Neal Bernard

Definition of “integrative medicine” – a form of medical therapy that combines practices and treatments from alternative medicine with conventional medicine (https://languages.oup.com/)

Video of this podcast:

Shonda (00:00): Hi, and hello, today's format is a bit different. We actually recorded a video along with our conversation. So if you choose, you can view this episode on the real food and drinks YouTube channel.

Shonda and Patryce (00:24): Hi and hello. Welcome to the real food and drinks lifestyle podcast. We're building a community to talk about nutrition, lifestyle choices, and just feeling better. This is Shonda, and this is Patryce. Let's just be real. Here's our disclaimer. We do not officially practice in any of the various subjects that we discuss. We are only sharing our personal experiences with you to a healthier lifestyle. Please do your own research before taking part in any of these practices.

Shonda (01:09): Yeah. Okay. Hi. So it's our first day recording face to face and we'll see how this goes. And, but, um,

Shonda (01:18): You know, we're in the middle of still COVID 19 and a lot of things are, are, are happening. Um, what, um, you know, we found some snippets that we'll be sharing with you all. And, um, today we found, what did we find, tell them what, what we found.

Patryce (01:40): One snippet that we thought that was interesting. There was a conversation, uh, two gentlemen, and they were talking about lots of talk about people dying, dying due, due to COVID 19, which is so true, but that they also commented that there's not a lot of talk about solutions, right? There's not much talk about solutions other than well, the main solution or yeah. Is the main solution of discussion seems to be about the vaccination, about the vaccine... Preparing for the vaccine.

Shonda (02:13): And, you know, I think when I talk to some people, that's all I hear, well, I guess we'll wait for this vaccine to come out, you know? And it's like, but there are other things we can do to help, you know? Um, and so kind of like what we haven't talked about yet is like why people take medications versus real food, you know, versus eating the real food. They're they're, you know, more, they're just waiting for the pill. It's like, it's the magic pill, right? Or the magic vaccination,

Patryce (02:45): Hey, I think you've caught on to something is, you know, we're already somewhat trained like that, the magic prescriptions, the meds, and here yet, we're waiting on yet the ultimate med during this time, the vaccination for COVID-19. Whereas like you pointed out, are there some other things such as the diet, the food, nutrition, and I think I see glimmers of community. We see some communities or some people talking about the fact that food is important and real food is important and actually real medicine. And we are not trying to say that there's no place for doctors and hospitals. Of course there are, there, there is. But we're also trying to say there's a place for preventative. And also for some of these treatments, I've heard of include giving vitamin C and then making sure you're eating a nutritionally packed, um, meal or meals that you're eating good food, real food.

Shonda (03:48): What, what did they talk about when from that little snippet, what else was in there? Um, I had a thought, but I can't remember (laughs),

Patryce (03:56): Another thing they pointed out, I think is that, especially in certain communities, there's more of junk food or less real food available. So when you're in a neighborhood where there are the mom and pop, well, I don't want to say mom and pop like junk food or processed food haven. Then that is where you're going. You're going to those places. Whereas if you don't have the healthiest choices, you may have to just start at home... Buying your food and eating real food that you prepare at home.

Shonda (04:34): Because I know they did mention, so what is this not eating real food leading to it's leading to what they say are the underlying causes, the diabetes, the high blood pressure, you know, what were some other things?, But these things, these conditions are created through diet. Now there's so much data out there that proves that, you know, so we need to talk about the solutions and you know, so even if we aren't directly talking about the solution to COVID-19 because we, we just know which groups have the most difficult time. And I think also a body mass index over a certain number?...

Patryce (05:18): Obecity is so on the rise in America period. But we are also learning that people who are obese, that the higher BMI, the unhealthy BMI, they are the ones not, they're more compromised in. Many of them are dying.

Shonda (05:36): Yeah. So, so we want to call people who know that they are dealing with these diseases who know that they're, you know, overweight. We need to say, Hey, we're not going to take a pill to cover that up because that's not making you healthier. And we can see from COVID-19, that's not making us healthier, just taking a pill. You're not getting the symptoms, but you still have the underlying disease. The pills are not the solution. They are not, they are not solving this. You know, they're not getting rid of the disease. You still have it. You're just able to live with it. Right.

Patryce (06:18): That's a very good point that although you are getting your symptoms under control, in many cases, you are not alleviating the source of those symptoms such as, um, again, we're not saying we're doctors here, but we, we know people who have been say, you're on six meds, it's better to be on less meds. Even if you had to take a medicine six versus one med, um, like you pointed out, we're finding out that, well, we know the meds don't treat the underlying condition. And also we don't want to underestimate the fact that there are a lot of side effects to these meds. Whereas with the real food, there are no side effects.

Shonda (06:57): Yeah. But even before we talk about the side effects, let's, let's think about this. So I have a medical condition or diabetes or high blood pressure that can be helped by food, but I'm going to decide, nah, I want to keep eating this food. So I'm going to keep taking the medicine just so I can keep eating this food that I love. And in some instances is food that you love. And in some instances, people may not be aware of it. They truly may not have the education yet to understand that there's a correlation there, but in lots of places, you know, and a lot of it ...for a lot of individuals, they're just not willing to make that change because they love certain particular foods so much that they're going to take the pill so you can keep eating the way you want to eat.

Patryce (07:52): Well. Um, I do think that's a big part of the problem and I, I don't want to throw words out there, but food addiction comes to mind. Um, so I want to validate people who are finding it hard, say they are realizing, I just don't like this whole, I feel bad. I take my pills and sometimes even feel bad after I take my pills. So there is that issue of food addiction. So what are some of the solutions if you're in that situation right now? Right?

Shonda (08:23): So if it's just a food addiction and it's really just about making choices, right? I mean, we know, I hear, okay, get everything out of the house. That's not good for you. But I mean, in some instances that's hard for people to do, but in many instances you are eating because you are feeling hungry, right? You have, something's triggering that you're hungry now. And from, I think that it could be a lack of nutrition in the food that could just trigger, just keep eating, eating, because you need more calories, you need more something. But the thing is, you kind of have, if that's the situation where you can't get everything out because someone else lives in the house and it's just not going to happen. I think that you have to make sure that you have your foods to go to,

Shonda (09:23): You know,

Patryce (09:24): Okay. And I'm asking these questions because, you know, there've been foods that, I mean, I ate, I ate for taste for years and years and if it tastes good, I would eat four or five servings of it,

Shonda (09:38): I think we all eat for taste. And I mean, I can, I can admit to that. And you know, a little, I'm just usually so busy that food is like second to what I'm doing, but, um, I do enjoy good tastes. So I just think it's just a matter of trying something different. And then, and finding those foods that you like, and if they're real foods, you can eat as many of them as you want to, you know, you don't have to limit yourself. There's no counting calories. There's no, Oh, I shouldn't eat that because I had enough, you know, um, I just heard on the, Oh, another snippet from something I was listening to yesterday, um, like an ounce of chicken, let's say meat has maybe a hundred calories where as you get 12 ounces of broccoli for a hundred calories, you know, and so that's going to fill you up.

Shonda (10:39): Now I know just eating broccoli doesn't sound exciting for people, but we're talking maybe broccoli with some, uh whole grain rice, you know, added in there and, uh, a good, healthy sauce, you know, they're, they're, plant-based sauces that you can make that can make that a yummy meal. I'm not just talking about, you know, throw some rice and broccoli and eat up. I mean, yeah, that's boring. Especially if you're addicted to food, that's very boring, but you can make that taste good. You know, you could do the garlic and the spices and the, you know, like I said, the plant-based cheeses, if you want cheese and broccoli and rice, I mean, it's all, it's all possible. You just have to do it . Really.

Patryce (11:24): Wow. Well, I totally agree with you. And I think the practical advice that...have on hand, the thing that you can go to and feel guilt free about, right? Because I know it's been so challenging in the past when, although I'm not partaking in certain foods, I am buying it for the rest of the family. And so when I did not take that advice that you just share, uh, I'm just seeing what they're eating. It's just easier. So it sounds a lot like you're saying, you know, be prepared. So there is some planning and upfront, but also there's, uh, planning and being intentional, but also having to change our habits or make new good habits. Because part of eating sometimes is about the habit, the habit, just to make a sandwich. I used to love sandwiches. I spoke ...

Shonda (12:23): And there's nothing wrong with sandwiches. It's just, what are you putting into it? What's the bread made out of.

Patryce (12:28): The bread has been an option. That's been a challenge for me because to buy... You need off the shelf bread, which is the most convenient, had not been as easy to find. But then I was able to find uh, what do you call those? The Brown rice tortillas and fill those up. I just got other things to replace the traditional bread.

Shonda (12:50): The Ezekiel Sprouted bread is still a good choice. Yeah. That's in the freezer section.

Patryce (12:56): That is in the freezer section. Yeah.

Shonda (12:58): But you just pop it in the toaster oven, you know,

Patryce (13:02): That's another good choice. You're right. And even, uh, I love kelp. They sell the little snacks, but they also sell the large square of seaweed and putting some food in there and rolling it up with some good sauce.

Shonda (13:18): Well, let me tell you, that's going to be an acquired taste for someone who's addicted to the standard or standard American diet. Right. I think, I mean, kelp and sea kelp is not normally found in the standard American diet. I mean, I'm just saying that may be more of a transition type of thing. I mean, it's good to try. I mean, it has iodine, it has really healthy benefits to it, but I just wanted, I just want to say to those of you who may be really addicted to standard American food, you know, we're not trying to get you to make this big leap. We want to gradually help, you know, some things you like that you commonly now enjoy just remake them in a different way.

Patryce (14:06): Yes. Just meet remake them in a different way. And I guess I've always been adventurous with food before I will try anything. And if you don't like it, you don't like it. You can at least try it. Um, also I've noticed that I can buy crackers instead of the bread, certain crackers, I've found black, black rice, red rice crackers that you can buy. And they're a little smaller, but they're yummy with uh, whatever you want to put on top of that. So what you said earlier is that we have to be intentional. We have to have a plan and find a community of others who will support you in this, right. I think that can't be underestimated the power of support.

Shonda (14:46): And online, online, there are really good Facebook groups. I don't know how everyone feels about Facebook or even, you know, I find that like following certain people or companies on Instagram, you know, and there's really like, no, I guess what is it? Politics and other things you can be distracted by on Instagram, really, but it's just, uh, a healthy, you know, you can choose who you want there. You can choose some healthy food, uh, creators, you know, to come and just feed your, your feed with things that will inspire you.

Patryce (15:26): That's a great idea. Okay. So these are some good ideas. And then I wanted to throw in there, we're talking about real food and real drinks. I found for myself, um, in the past, when I ate a lot more, um, I was eating more than I would drink, or I was eating so much and forgetting to drink water in the morning, and then maybe having the first glass of water halfway through the afternoon.

Shonda (15:57): Well, I had to bring mine here with us because I have not had anything to drink today. And it is 1:30.

Patryce (16:03): And I haven't, I just had a smoothie, but I did not have any water. And what I found out is that often when you're going there and you're eating, eating, it's because you're body is thirsty. So check yourself. And say, when you have hunger think, well, did I drink anything at all today? Or did I drink very little? So maybe I need to just get some water in my body and then see if I'm still hungry, or maybe I won't be as yeah. Good point. Yeah.

Shonda (16:34): Good point. Yeah. And, and to make sure to, I think drink, you know, maybe even 30 minutes before a meal helps to, you know. Helps so you won't water down your digestive juices and you know, so there there's a lot of things. Yeah. I think there are a lot of things to eating that was once natural. But now, because we have foods that are unnatural, you know, our ability to recognize the natural, the real is off we're, we're off kilter or, you know, we're just, you know, we're looking for those, um, those chemical, um, reactions or those chemical responses to our brain rather than just the natural body processes of, of food gratification and things, you know,

Patryce (17:31): That's a little deep, but I think you're right. I mean, and going back to, uh, the addiction, we find that a lot of foods have an overabundance of sodium and even added sugar, we talked in another podcast about that. So those are some of the other reactions. Our body is craving things due to overloading it, or, yeah so it's looking for that.

Shonda (17:50): What about, I know you've heard this too. What about the companies that are doing research? Like, you know, like maybe in the Pringles chips, I think they talked about that about, you know, how do we make them want more? What, what chemicals are we going to add to make more, you know, some people probably now a lot of people are aware. There's, they're like, well, it's just still tasting good. I'm going to eat it. You know, but you know, maybe someone doesn't know and, and you don't want to be taken advantage of, you don't want to be you know tricked into eating a food just because it's got a chemical or some type of lure, you know, that reminds me of like my, my husband fishing lures, you know?

Patryce (18:31): Uh, well, I think that's so true that with the chemicals and all the additives, I mean, that's why say McDonald's, it's not probably the most, it honestly, people, if they had grown up on this quality of food and what have you, they probably wouldn't even like the taste, but now their taste buds have been trained to crave that.

Shonda (18:58): It's a chemical. It's a drug. So just a little bit of it is like activating those, you know, pleasure places in the brain or whatever, and they just want more and you have to have the willpower to say, no.

Patryce (19:13): That's true. That's true. And then, yeah, another thing willpower is important and being intentional and planning, but also I have learned that we can retrain our taste buds, but yeah, so for every salt, sugary, chemically chemical based food that we've eaten, you can start eating more green, green greens. Be it kale, we've talked about that a lot and stuff like that, but even bitter herbs have been proven that if you partake in, even a small amount of these things, it curbs your appetite, but also it, it retrains your taste buds to be more accepting of not... Other things, not just the sugars and not just the salty and processed foods.

Shonda (20:02): Yeah. So we can go deep into the gut microbiome and all this stuff that's happening down in there. Or we can just say, Hey, you know what, when you eat better, your body automatically changes. And you know, it wants better. I mean, that's just plain truth. yeah.

Patryce (20:21): I like that plain description. It wants better, but we have to, like you said, take the first step to do differently.

Shonda (20:31): I was just going to say, cause meanwhile, your body's just doing the best with what it's being given.

Patryce (20:36): That's true. Yeah. I think people should be encouraged. Like you said that, yeah. We're not saying it's easy to just change overnight a hundred percent, but every little change adds to a longterm big change. So be encouraged that we can change.

Shonda (20:59): Yeah, definitely. Yeah. I like that.

Patryce (21:04): I guess I wanted to talk a little about, and that we touched on this some too... Defending unhealthy behavior.

Shonda (21:11): Okay. Yeah. I think that's what he was talking about. Yeah. Okay. Carry on.

Patryce (21:17): Well, I, I, I think that we'll hit a nerve with a lot of people hearing it, either in that forum or our forum or in any form. It's almost like people want to protect their, their right to, to living unhealthy and, and like, how dare you try to tell me how to live? And I know that it's a catch 22 because we're not trying to tell people how to live. But at the same time, we want to exercise our right to make unhealthy choices with them. When we have those horrible repercussions to it, then you still, those same people want help. So instead of just crying for the help afterwards, maybe embracing when people bring up, these are some unhealthy behaviors, not look at it, they're judging you, but maybe we can say, we're loving you because I know you and I both, you know, it's about, we want the best for anyone. Once it goes for our family, ourselves, our family, our community. So maybe we can re-think that just because something's you're right. Do you want to exercise that? Right. I think it's gotten to the point now where with food, it's our right to eat whatever we want, but do we want to continue to embrace those consequences?

Shonda (22:41): That's why we're doing this. You know, I mean, we're, we're trying to share, we want to share the knowledge that we have because we have benefited from changing our diets. Right? And we want to share it and we just want everyone to embrace it. And it is something that you have to decide to do for yourself. No one can do it. And luckily, uh, the podcast and maybe this video cast will, you know, it's in a space that you can listen to privately, so you can keep coming back and joining us, you know, and no one needs to know that you're even listening or, and we hope we're inspiring, you know. But, uh, we, we want to help be your support system. You know, you can email us with questions and, and, and things go to the website and, and send us messages, voice messages and emails alike. So yeah. What, we're more, we're more do you have on that one?

Patryce (23:45): Just that is a (I think) sore subject. Yeah. I mean, I've seen it in my own life and then I see it within, you know, what is so liberating when you meet some of the people that you've just been a little ahead of in your walk on changing something. And so you've seen other people who like were so against certain things or not ready to receive. And then you meet them years later and they're like telling you some of the same things.

Shonda (24:11): Well, now, that's a good thing. That's a really good thing. But you know, and it's true in anything, not just food and health, you know, but anything that's going on in our life, you know, to make that change, we've got to decide, because I know that there's in the beginning, there's like this hesitance, like, Oh, it's been like this forever. It's never gonna change. You know, nothing I can do is going to make a change. You know,.

Patryce (24:42): It's too hard, it's too inconvenient. I go to parties, no one is, everyone's asking why I'm not eating this. And why am I eathing that...And you know what? we are right there with you. I mean? There's always going to be someone who might not understand where you're coming from at that point in time, but that's okay.

Patryce (25:02): Just be encouraged that you can still be strong and your conviction for what you're doing at this time in your life. And then along the way, maybe others will be encouraged to try and do the same. Um, and talking about that, I just want to, you know, we've already said, we're careful, we're not doctors, and we're not trying to tell you what to do, but we do encourage you be your own advocate. And what that means is it's okay to ask questions, please do ask questions. Although we are going to doctors. And we have seen them and they've gone to school much longer than most of us. And have studied some things. They have done a great deal of good for us, but at the same time, honestly, from the doctor I've spoken with, their, they'll tell you, we did not study nutrition.

Shonda (26:00): Right. They did not study nutrition. And I think, you know, even some doctors that may know that there's something else they can do, they may not have faith in, in the, in their patient. You know, they may just say, well, this is the easiest way. I'm just going to give them this pill too. So they're thinking, you know, Oh, well, they can't, they can't make a change. I mean, you know, I mean, come on, do you really want to live up to that doctor's expectation of you that you can't do better? I mean, I know that's like a, that's a hard pill to swallow, right?

Patryce (26:41): Yeah. I had not thought about that Shonda. But that's, that's a good point. That's a good point that maybe the doc, in some situations, the medical community feels like, well, these, most of my patients are probably not looking to make a change. They're just looking for these pills. And unfortunately, nothing against the doctors, but the pharmaceutical companies are on top of doctors all the time. They are constantly trying to have doctors promote certain drugs. Every time a drug comes out. I mean, it's a money. It is a revenue generator. It is part of the economy. And so we have that whole other part of it. I can't even begin to understand all the ramifications that the whole money and big pharma and all that, you know, there's a lot that could be said probably a whole podcast about that. But going back to what you said, I think it's just important that you talk to your doctor... Ask questions. And if you feel a little shy about that, take a friend with you, take a spouse, I've heard people bringing a husband or wife or friend. Do that. Or, you know what, maybe you're just shy like, Oh, this that might sound stupid or they'll be annoyed. Keep it short, make a list..

Shonda (27:57): Yeah, well guess what I just saw recently at pcrm.org, I'll put the link with this uh podcast, video cast or whatever we decide. There... They have an article how to talk to your doctor about going plant-based, you know, or eating more plant based foods. And you know, maybe that you do want to make the change to get off certain medications, how to talk to your doctor about it.

Patryce (28:24): I love it. I love it. That's what we need. People need to be more, feel more empowered, be more empowered. That's all we're saying, be your own advocate. And if you have to bring someone with you or even bring that article or parts that you've written down from that uh resource that you're going to share Shonda... Do it. There've been so many times when I have heard people say, well, know if I can ask the doctor or the doctor knows that. And I'm not saying at the end of the day, they don't know best, but they are still human beings and they don't know everything. And they will say many of them who are embracing a lot of the different things we've talked about. It's not that they're against it. They were just never taught that it wasn't what they were taught.

Shonda (29:05): Yeah, but I'm still thinking. There are either two reasons why the doctor doesn't, wel, maybe three, you know, share these things with you. Uh, one, they are unaware. They're just totally unaware. Two, like I said earlier, they just don't believe or have faith in you as a patient, I don't know. That's just my point of view that may be, you know, not right. But three, I mean, you know, the doctors making money off writing these prescriptions.

Patryce (29:36): Well, that's another whole podcast. Okay.

Shonda (29:40): All right. I'll it at? I'll leave it at there. So in any way, if the doctor's not willing to talk about it, do you really want to keep this doctor? Consider those three options? Do you really want to keep that doctor? Okay. I'll, I'll leave it there.

Patryce (29:55): Yeah. It's a very good point. But yeah. Uh, I, I think it more and more doctors are out... Are understanding that when the doc, when the patient comes, they want to talk about the whole body. So it's that part of that is what am I eating? What am I eating? And one thing you did bring up in, you know, well, I don't know if you brought it up, but I think doctors are pressed for time and that's it. How many patients they have, they don't get a lot of time to each patient. So I'm not saying we have a solution to all this, but again, having that list to make it a little more concise, or if, if, if any, you have insurance, um, programs, or what have you, where you can call the nurse line. Maybe that's another option or perhaps if they do have, uh, your insurance has it, where you can also talk to nutritionists. That might be another start. And not that... You're learning something. And then anything you're reading about, and you can bring to your nutritionist and start forming a relationship with them as well as the doctor so that it doesn't have to be just the doctor, because honestly, I, I'm not in their shoes and depending on what practice they're in and so forth. Uh, there could be time constraints. So, so you don't feel like you're not heard or you're cheated out of time. Look at being, you know, approach your appointment with a plan.

Shonda (31:22): [inaudible]. And also now there are different doctors that put more out there on their bio about how they're eating and their approach. So if you're looking for a doctor, you can go do some research before, you know, going to see the doctor. I mean, I usually do that.

Patryce (31:44): Yeah, I'll just be honest again, I don't know, everyone's insurance situation, but when we had HMO, you are a lot more limited in that you have, if you don't go to a certain list of doctors, then you don't even get your benefits. Right. So I have, you know, don't want to run into that situation where you're going to a doctor and think it's covered and it's not, right. Yeah. So we're just saying to you do these things, but make sure you do it in the context of your insurance. Just in case, for someone not being able to get the main benefits from their insurance, but also, maybe this is a good time Shonda to encourage people to also look at what your insurance offerings are. Yeah. We changed, we had one kind of insurance when we were younger with younger kids or having, having kids because the HMO is awesome when you're having babies.

Patryce (32:34): But then later on, we changed the different types of, of, of, um, insurance. And then to find out that whole list of doctors, depending on it, if you go to a doctor outside your network, do they cover at all? Or do they cover some of it? I mean, just looking at some of those things. So sometimes you might feel more limited because of the insurance you have. But, um, I, I do think we should encourage people, even if you have a certain kind of insurance be, um, be researching, like Shonda said what the different options are, with the doctors. There are different doctors out there. Yeah. Yeah, definitely. Sure.

Patryce (33:12): Well I go to, there is Dr. Nash, she is under the insurance, it's under something called integrative medicine and [Shonda: That's a good term to look for. ]Yeah. Because functional medicine or at least the ones that got out in my area, they were not insuring they weren't taking insurance. So I wanted to start with someone who can take my insurance. Right. Although she still does these tests and all that stuff. And she might tend to go more on the other side, but you can always say you only want whatever tests you want, but also she seems to be open to the first appointment listening. And then also when some doctors won't run certain specific tests, she's more open to it. [Shonda: Integrative medicine is a good, uh, thing to search for when you're searching for the doctor. Yeah. I think that's, that's a good thing. Yeah. Thanks.] At the end of the day, we're all just trying to be real in getting healthier, having our best life. Yeah. That's all. That's all I got. [Shonda: Okay.]

Shonda (34:21): Thanks for listening. We hope you enjoy today's podcast. Remember you can catch show notes and additional details at realfoodanddrinks.com under the podcast menu. Also subscribe to our podcast if you aren't already a member of our community. And if listening through Anchor, please send us a message of topics you would like to hear us have conversations about until next time. Let's just be real.

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Podcast Episode 8 – Thanksgiving Meal Planning

Thanksgiving Holiday Meal Planning

Thanksgiving meal planning causing a bit of confusion? Perhaps you are worried about keeping to your health goals during this Holiday season? Or perhaps you just need a starting point? Today, we have a conversation about what we have planned for our Thanksgiving meals.

We reminisce about what we use to eat and discuss ways to make the same dishes, just in a healthier way. Thanksgiving meals don’t have to look that much different than what you remember from your childhood and years of the past.

Listen in on our meal planning, recipes, and how we intend to make it work with other family members who may eat a bit differently.

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If you haven’t done so already, download the Delicious “No-Fail” Salads Guide.

Show References:

More Resources:

Guide to a Vegan Thanksgiving (YouTube Video)

Free Recipe e-Cookbook for Thanksgiving

Shonda (00:00): And on that day, people, like you said, you just keep eating and eating just because, you know, it's just like the thing to do. So if you have these healthier options there and all the other stuff's running out, you know, Hey, there's more food they're going to pick on us. Like, Oh, well, I guess I'll try that.

Shonda and Patryce (00:28): Hi and hello. Welcome to the real food and drinks lifestyle podcast. We're building a community to talk about nutrition, lifestyle choices, and just feeling better. This is Shonda and this is Patryce. Let's just be real. [inaudible] Here's our disclaimer. We do not officially practice in any of the various subjects that we discuss. We are only sharing our personal experiences with you to a healthier lifestyle. Please do your own research before taking part in any of these practices.

Shonda (01:14): Holiday meals and planning around that. And I guess we're talking about what holidays used to look like, right? And how they're going to look just specifically for this year. So how have they been in the past? What'd they look like this year and how we plan on preparing some of those meals, you know, sharing recipes.

Patryce (01:36): Sounds great. We are already in November. So Thanksgiving is around the corner. I know in the past I have really looked forward to a certain kind of menu, a more traditional menu, and very, I would consider my more decadent foods or at least the preparation of the foods being more decadent. And for example, you know, most of us have the Turkey and or ham and, uh, can't forget the cornbread dressing. [Shonda: Is that a Southern thing?] That's a very good question. To be honest with you. Although I was born on the East coast and have a lot of relatives there, my family, my grandfather is from Alabama. So I actually totally familiar with the corn bread dressing, but, uh, there were a lot of other people who, and still do the whole just, is it called bread dressing? It's not corn bread. It's just dressing made... not with corn bread, which to me was like, that's not dressing. So maybe from the Southern roots, there's the more emphasis on cornbread dressing.

Shonda (02:48): We've got to talk about cornbread dressing is usually a little sweeter, right?

Patryce (02:53): Well, yeah. Especially when people use Jiffy. I used to use Jiffy all the times because it's cheap. It tastes good. Growing up I thought it's just, Ooh, this is some good corn bread, but, but it has a lot of sugar.

Shonda (03:06): I know I'm going to have to go back and look at that label and see what all is in there. Yeah. Just sugar, sugar probably the first ingredient. Right?

Patryce (03:15): Uh, I don't know if it's the first, but it's definitely, it's, it's more like corn cake.

Shonda (03:19): Right. Okay. What was, uh, your Thanksgiving like? It sounds similar to mine.

Patryce (03:24): Okay. Well then those cornbread, the cornbread dressing, and we used to put meat inside of it, whether it was sausage or lamb, you would add some meat and some drippings sometimes. [Shonda:Right, yeah.] And then you had the, uh gravy. Can't have the table without gravy.

Shonda (03:45): It's called, uh, Giblet gravy.

Patryce (03:50): Oh giblets, giblets.

Shonda (03:50): And that's Part of the like chicken, right? That's part of... Is that the liver?

Patryce (03:55): Okay. The liver, heart and gizzards and neck of the chicken. [Shonda: Okay.] And yeah, you're right. We used to use that to flavor your gravy, but I used to eat the giblets themselves sometimes, but, um, oh can't forget the Mac and cheese. I don't know about your family, but growing up and even I have one child who loves it and not just any kind, my sister loves to make her Mac and cheese with four cheeses, not just one. And I think some creams and it was one of the more decadent. And then that not just green beans, but the green bean casserole...Okay...

Shonda (04:33): I never caught onto the green bean casserole. I mean, I've heard about it many times, but I've really I've... It has like what mushroom canned mushrooms.

Patryce (04:42): Cream of mushroom canned cream of mushroom. And then you're going to put sometimes some cheese of some sort and then those, Ooh, those, what were those things? The little crispy onion.

Shonda (04:54): I don't think we had it that much. Yeah.

Patryce (04:56): We did. We did. And it's not, I didn't realize until I was older. Even those onions you put on the crispy onions, they're not good for you. Okay.

Shonda (05:07): We have some solutions to that. So I know that everybody listening is probably getting hungry and like, yeah, yeah, yeah. What changes? We can't change that, but you can change that and still enjoy some of those things. So we're going to talk about that, but go ahead. What else? We have macaroni and cheese and okay. Okay. I know what's next. I think.

Patryce (05:29): Well, after the green bean casserole there, you had to have the rolls. Some kind of rolls and those were good. And then you round it up with, you have to have something to wash all this down with. And I definitely think in Texas iced tea, sweetened ice tea, that's always been a hit, at least that was on our table. Some sweetened iced tea. And, uh, of course the finale has to be sweets.

Shonda (06:00): Uhmm, hmm

Patryce (06:01): And, uh, sweet potato pie, pumpkin pie. Uh, I can't... My sister would make red velvet sometimes cake, but not just one dessert, but an assortment of desserts.

Shonda (06:13): Yeah. More desserts than dinner. Additions, right? And then, than the other food. Yeah. The dessert, were like, okay, this is the part that everybody waiting for. And the thing that I never could understand is how can you have just eaten all of that and then still pile on dessert. I mean, don't, you need some time between that?

Patryce (06:37): It's amazing what we do to our bodies and how they somewhat bounce back. [Shonda: Yeah.]

Shonda (06:43): Yeah. After you sleep it off in the evening.

Patryce (06:46): Yeah. That's true.

Shonda (06:48): Well, Your sounds a lot like mine, you know, a lot, like I remember as a child and what I tried to emulate too having my own family, I guess those traditions were passed on? Yeah. We had fried turkeys and baked honey hams, Honeybaked hams.

Patryce (07:11): Well, I wonder though, you brought up something about maybe bouncing back some after we sleep. I'm just wondering, do you remember after these traditional type meals, how did you feel, or maybe during them, did, did you, at that time, were you ever aware of?

Shonda (07:28): Well you know I was tired.

Patryce (07:33): And I don't think you are the only one...I hear all the time...

Shonda (07:34): I do remember. I remember sitting at tables with my relatives, you know, and like, like just out of it, you know, brain fog, even then, although I didn't know what brain fog was. I didn't have it to interfere with anything just because I was a child. So when I became a parent, you know, my responsibility was to take care of my child where I couldn't do it if my brain wasn't working. So that's why I probably never really noticed it until I became an adult. Yeah.

Patryce (08:04): Yeah, I wanted to... Because you've always been a little more sensitive to listen to your body. And, and you're right about the whole being a child versus the adult where you have more responsibilities. But now that I think about it, even as a child and definitely as I got older, that whole overwhelming feeling of like, this is good, but I am full, but I'm still eating and I am definitely full, but I am still eating and I'm thinking, what was I doing? But, um, I think back, and even as a child, there were times where I'm like, after that first dessert, that probably was enough because I had that huge meal, but I just had the taste of next one and the next one. And so, um, and for me, I would get that whole, I don't, it's hard to describe like a cotton mouth. And I think that's because I've shared in the past, my whole not wanting dairy anymore of the feeling like allergies or cotton, mouth and sugar. If I have too much sugar, I just get the cotton mouth feeling, um, that I used to ignore as a younger person. But now looking back as we've been reminiscing about these meals, I think that I was experiencing it, maybe not to the same degree, but just ignoring it more or less. [Shonda: Okay, Yeah.]

Shonda (09:16): So we've grown up a little bit, we've experienced life. And we decided, I think both of us decided we want to make a change, right? Because we wanted to have better health and you know, and it's been a step of progress along the way. You know, I feel like I've arrived at where I want to be right now, uh, where I intend on staying, you know, I guess for those who are listening for the first time or who haven't heard me say, so I'm full whole plant-based. So I no longer eat any animal products. Uh, it's been for three years now. And, uh, uh, just what my body appreciates. It causes me to eat more vegetables before eating any other foods, vegetables are upfront now. Whereas when I would eat meat, I would put my vegetables as sides. You know, so now when I cook for my family, because they still eat meat and many times it is a, a vegan meal that I prepare for them. And they're responsible for maybe doing their own meat sometimes, you know, meat is a side. So that's how I approach it. So you can share how you design your , your meals.

Patryce (10:29): Well, I can just piggyback off of what you just said. Um, unlike you, I'm not a hundred percent plant based diet, but I do treat the meat as the side and not the main. So the meat compliments, the vegetable packed or plant-based diet more so. And the types of meats I, I have decided, um, and even as a family, we do more lean meats. We, we, there are certain meats we just abstain from, we just choose not to do the pork and the beef. And instead we do the bison and lamb and, um, and we, we do salmon in my family. Uh, so we do have a few meat products, still in my family, but they are not showcased in the meal. They're the compliment. And for example, bison is a choice because, um, from our research, they're in the wild. So they're more responsibly... Not even raised, but they are killed in the wild.

Patryce (11:31): And then they're, they're less processed, more responsibly raised because they're not in these, you know, unhealthy environments being shot up with perhaps steroids or hormones and the salmon, the same thing we go out of our way to find as best we can the. Um, I'm able to get at Trader Joe's, the, the frozen, what do you call wild, Alaskan salmon. So we try to be as responsible as we can about where is it sourced and how is it processed. So if I can find a co-op and I have in the past where I know they're raising their own chickens and they are doing it the responsible way, the old fashioned way, then we would buy those chickens.

Shonda (12:15): The old-fashion way, right? [Patryce: Oh, Yeah.] The way it's supposed to be done. Right? Okay. So that's where we both are. Um, what are your plans for Thanksgiving week or day?

Patryce (12:30): Um, I do try to do a little planning with thinking high level about what what's going to be put on the table or offered on the table so that, um, I've have my eyes open for coupons or, or just suppliers of, uh, what I want to put on the table. So maybe a week or two before, uh, Thanksgiving, I'll think about the menu. And for example, if we're going to have duck, I'll make sure I make a trip to the farmer's market to get that duck from the provider and feel like they responsibly raised that duck, especially with the meat that I arranged in advance, to be able to procure that. So, um, it's, it's just being intentional about my shopping, but when you do spend the holidays with any friends or family, Hey, solicit them, bringing what they want to bring too. That's been a great help.

Shonda (13:22): You know, that's what I'm doing this year. I have suggested to each one of them that they make a dish. [Patryce: Super.] So I'm still going to do some of those same things. I'm going to make my cornbread from scratch. And then I'm going to use it to make cornbread dressing with cranberries, and it's going to be fresh cranberries. It will not be the cranberry jelly, whatever. I'm sure my son is going to bring that cause he loves that stuff, but you know, if that's what he needs.

Patryce (13:51): Hey more power to him. Bring it. Let him bring it.

Shonda (13:55): So, I am going to make a sweet potato pie. I've already tried that one and posted it. My daughter has tried it and she liked it. So that's a keeper. Um, I will be making, I have not made this yet, uh, from the same website that I got the cornbread dressing is going to be a, uh, a beanie loaf. And this one is made out of walnuts and chickpeas. Oh yeah. I'll make sure and link that one up and I'm going to make a salad and it's going to be probably not as much of a meal salad as I normally make, because I have the dressing, you know, I have the beanie loaf, so it's probably just going to be like a kale salad with carrots and maybe some more dried cranberries and probably cucumbers on the side. I just like cucumbers, but I want to kind of premake the salad, you know, and kale is tough enough to premake and you can sit it in there with the dressing and kind of let it marinate. So I'm just going to throw in a lot of, it's just mostly going to be a vegetable salad. So that's my plan. I don't know what they will be bringing or what they intend to make, but I think I've covered everything that I would like to have to eat. That's going to satisfy me as a holiday meal.

Patryce (15:15): Well, it sounds delicious to me, and I'm excited that you're sharing some of these recipes on your website and it sounds similar to ours. Um, what I'm hoping, uh, on top of the protein, then we're going to have a cornbread dressing as well. And I make it with a lot of vegetables, celery, onions, carrots, and rosemary, and I've made it with and without the cranberries as well. So I'll decide later on on that, but you know what I'm excited about this year, I want to do a vegan Mac and cheese, and I have a very good friend who says that she has friends even pay her to make her make them a delicious one. So if I can't convince her to make me a vegan Mac and cheese, I'm going to ask for her recipe,

Shonda (16:01): There are so many different ways to make a vegan cheese. You know, I used to just make it with like nutritional yeast and some cashews and, and, and plant-based milk, but I mean, you know, throwing in some carrots in there for more color and using actual potatoes instead of like a starch. Yeah. Okay. So I may make that for them because you know what I have made one that they did not argue about and it used butternut squash.

Patryce (16:30): So I'm looking forward to the whole vegan Mac and cheese this year, but also my family likes potatoes. So we're going to do the Japanese sweet potatoes. That's probably a mainstay at our house anyway. And then, you know, instead of that traditional green bean casserole, we just, we just steam green beans these days, or we'll have steamed broccoli, one of those. And then I like yourself make a kale salad. But with ours, it's complimented or we have the quinoa mixed in the kale salad. And you know what, I won't be making ice tea. If someone wants to make it, they can, but there'll be water. And maybe we'll splurge with some juice spritzers, um, fruit juice base spritzers or something like that. But, um, there's nothing wrong with just even having just water to wash this all down with yeah. The sweet potato pie. I'm going to make the one that you have the recipe for on your website. And then I like to offer fruit. That's a wonderful way to have dessert. So I sometimes make these little fruit kebabs, and they're very popular. You just put some pineapple, strawberries, grapes, whatever vegetables, uh whatever fruit you like. And that's another way for a yummy dessert.

Shonda (17:42): Yeah. Okay. Yeah. And you know, that, that website I'm talking about that even have a green bean casserole recipe. Yeah, they do. So, um,

Patryce (17:53): I'll have to check it out. This is going to be so similar and this is, what's so exciting these days, Shonda, you know, people keep thinking, if you're changing things up majorly, it's like, Oh, you're, you're messing up the holidays or you're restricting yourself. And woe is me or woe is you... And no, I don't want to do that. But if you just will try, it's amazing what, how your eyes are open to new things, tasting just as good.

Shonda (18:23): They can or even tasting in a different way, but still good. You know, there are new tastes to be explored. And, you know, the thought just came to me that because we're doing Thanksgiving differently due to COVID 19 and social distancing, this can be the perfect opportunity for many of our listeners to, you know, go ahead and, um, try a different plan this year because it's just, you know, it's just mostly them and you won't be concerned about other family members saying, Oh, I don't want that. Or commenting or whatever the case. It may be difficult for some., But this would be a good opportunity to try something new,

Patryce (19:10): Excellent opportunity. And I love that reminder because like you said, even within your own family, because some of us have older or adult children, if they really feel like, well, I want this and this, well, then they can make it.

Shonda (19:24): And you know what? And on that day, people, like you said, you just keep eating and eating just because, you know, it's just like the thing to do. So if you have these healthier options there and all the other stuff's running out, you know, Hey, there's more food they're gonna, they're going just like, Oh, well, I guess I'll try that.

Patryce (19:43): That's a good idea too. I love it. I love it.

Shonda (19:47): You know, I feel better that I have a plan. And, uh, from talking with you now, I, I feel definite. So, um, thank you for today. [Patryce: Thank you.] So be encouraged everybody try something new for your health this year, and it's going to be a great start.

Patryce (20:06): And if you do try things or have ideas, please feel free to share them with us. We'd love to know what you guys area planning to do too.

Shonda (20:13): Thanks for listening. We hope you enjoy today's podcast. Remember you can catch show notes and additional details at realfoodanddrinks.com under the podcast menu. Also subscribe to our podcast if you aren't already a member of our community. And if listening through anchor, please send us a message of topics you would like to hear us have conversations about until next time. Let's just be real.

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